Now Playing
Mix 965 Tulsa
Last Song Played
Today's Best Music!
On Air
No Program
Now Playing
Mix 965 Tulsa
Last Song Played
Today's Best Music!

business

200 items
Results 21 - 30 of 200 < previous next >

6 money-saving hacks for apartment renters

From the moment you start searching for an apartment until your last goodbye to the landlord, there are numerous fees, utility costs and more than can make having your own place a little more expensive than you planned.

>> Read more trending news

There are several money-saving hacks to trim some of those added costs, according to frugal bloggers, lifestyle pros and real estate experts.

Each one of the tips below will help you save a little money so that you can save toward splurges and bigger goals− like homeownership.

1. Check out rentals in the chilly months.

While November through February offer fewer rental options, you can strike a deal for a lower rent more often and more easily in the winter months, according to Lifehacker. Landlords have to look harder for tenants in these slow apartment hunting months, so they might be more willing to take less rent or a lower deposit, or to offer a few extra services than what you'd get in spring and summer.

2. Choose floor No. 2. 

While conventional wisdom indicates saving money by opting for a floor that's higher in the building, that cheaper rent could push your other bills higher, according to the Wise Bread blog. Choosing the second floor of a place with three levels of units saves dramatically on the utility bill -- far better than getting a nominal rent break. The best insulated floor of three is the second, which is particularly important if you'll be paying for air conditioning in the sunny South.

3. Power down on the electric bill.

If you're responsible for the electric bill at the apartment, hack away at it, real estate website Trulia advised. Be sure to identify energy sappers like appliances that use a remote control or an external power supply or have a continuous display, Trulia said. All of them continue to use electricity even after they're turned off. To save as much as $150 on your power bill annually, invest in a smart power strip and plug in such devices as TVs, cable boxes and game consoles to cut off "phantom power" at the source.

4. Save on renters insurance

You could always save on renters insurance by forgoing it altogether, but that leaves you open to losing all you own, according to The Balance. Instead, get the insurance, but economize by exploring professional discounts if you are in a profession such as police officer, firefighter, teacher or nurse or are a credit union member or retiree.

If you haven't already chosen where to rent, you may want to opt for apartments near a fire station, in a low crime area or in a newer building to further reduce your renter's insurance.

5. Make a movable bathroom floor upgrade

A lot of the most affordable apartments, and even some of the pricier ones, have unattractive, cold or warped bathroom floors. To keep from losing your deposit by altering the actual bathroom floor, consider making an inexpensive deck tile upgrade that merely rests on the floor and can be used at your next place, too, RentManager.com suggested. And instead of cutting tiles to fit that specific floor, fill in the hard-to-fit nooks and crannies with black river rocks.

6. Walk through on your way out. 

Make time to schedule a walk-through at the empty apartment before you're gone for good, Wise Bread recommended. Look at the place with your apartment manager, and review any charges you might incur against your deposit and any outstanding bills. While it's tempting to avoid the face-to-face even if you've had a wonderful rental experience, having the supervisor sign off on notes from your conversation lays the groundwork for protests far better than waiting to get the refund in the mail.

RELATED: Don't phone it in: 5 hacks for getting the best mobile phone plan

Chin up: 4 ways to get over the rejection and ace the rejection letter

Receiving a rejection letter is never enjoyable, but responding properly will help you place the experience in the "what doesn't kill you makes you stronger" category. Resisting the urge toward self-pity is important, according to LinkedIn job search expert Susan P. Joyce, because rejection can douse you with the kind of negative energy that will drain you and make the next stage of your job search tougher.

>> Read more trending news 

Instead, try these four proven methods for responding positively to a rejection letter:

1. Don't go away mad

Don't allow yourself to become angry at the employer, the situation or yourself, U.S. News and World Report advises. "You might think that you were perfect for the job and resent the employer for not seeing it, or even feel angry that you spent your time interviewing. But rejection comes with the territory when you're hunting for a job."

Remind yourself that a rejection letter is definitely preferable to the increasing tendency of employers to "ghost" applicants instead of directly rejecting them.

2. Send a thank-you note

"If you sincerely liked the people and the organization and would want to be considered when another opportunity opens there, the biggest mistake you can make is giving up on the employer and the people you liked," notes Joyce. 

3. Remember you might be a runner up

Especially if you were one of a few finalists for a job, things might still go your way after you receive that rejection letter, notes Business Insider. The company might decide to hire two people, or the first hire might ultimately reject the job offer or never start the job. If that happens, you want to be on the record as someone who can stand tall even after getting a rejection letter.

4. Ask, without arguing

The company that rejected you can't really harm you further, so you have nothing to lose by asking the hiring manager for feedback, career coach Ashley Stahl told Forbes. Employers aren't likely to respond helpfully to a general question like, "Why didn't I get the job?" but you can gain helpful input with strategic, pointed questions. Stahl recommends a query such as, "Was there something missing from my background that you were looking for?" to allow you to pinpoint what you might need for a similar job with other employers.

RELATED: 5 things that are costing you the promotion you want

NAACP warns black passengers about flying American Airlines

The NAACP issued a nationwide travel advisory on Tuesday warning black passengers to be wary of flying American Airlines amid a “pattern of disturbing incidents.”

>> Read more trending news

The civil rights group warned that “booking and boarding flights on American Airlines could subject (black passengers) to disrespectful, discriminatory or unsafe conditions.”

American Airlines spokeswoman Shannon Gilson told CNN that the company was “disappointed” to hear about the NAACP advisory and vowed that American Airlines is committed to safe travel for everyone.

Officials with the NAACP said the group has spent several months monitoring reports of “disturbing incidents” from African-American passengers.

Among those, officials pointed to an incident on a flight from Atlanta to New York in which an African-American woman said she and her infant child were removed from a flight because she asked if someone would get her stroller before they got off the plane.

>> Related: NAACP issues first ever travel advisory for a state in the U.S.

“The growing list of incidents suggesting racial bias reflects an unacceptable corporate culture and involves behavior that cannot be dismissed as normal or random,” said Derrick Johnson, who was named president and CEO of the NAACP last week. “Until these and other concerns are addressed, this national travel advisory will stand.”

Gilson told CNN that American Airlines planned to invite representatives of the NAACP to the company’s headquarters in Fort Worth, Texas, in response to the group’s call for a meeting with airline leadership.

"We are committed to having a meaningful dialogue about our airline and are ready to both listen and engage," she told the news station.

The travel advisory issued by the NAACP on Tuesday is the second from the group in recent months. In August, officials warned black travelers to steer clear of Missouri due to the high risk of unnecessary search and seizure for African-Americans in the state.

The August advisory was the first ever issued by the NAACP for a state.

Delta hiring 1,000 flight attendants

Delta Air Lines is hiring more than 1,000 flight attendants.

>> Read more trending news

The average entry-level flight attendant at Delta earns about $25,000 a year, “with an opportunity to earn more depending upon schedule,” according to airline officials.

Officials with Atlanta-based Delta said applicants must have a high school degree or GED, be at least 21 years old, be able to work in the United States and be fluent in English.

The ideal candidate is also fluent in a language other than English, has education beyond high school and more than a year of experience in customer service, patient care or a similar role. Other experience that helps includes work to ensure the safety or care of others, such as a teacher, military, EMT, firefighter, coach, law enforcement, lifeguard or nurse, according to Delta officials.

Airline officials said 150,000 people applied for about 1,200 flight attendant positions last year, and fewer than 1 percent of applicants were selected.

Delta officials said “based on those odds, it’s easier to get into an Ivy League school than to become a Delta flight attendant.”

To learn more about Delta’s flight attendant jobs, click here.

Ford recalls 1.3 million trucks for door latch issue

Ford Motor Co. is recalling approximately 1.3 million 2015-2017 F-150 and 2017 Super Duty vehicles in North America.

In a Wednesday news release, the company said a water shield needs to be added to door latches. Without the shield, the latches could freeze and cause the door to not close or open correctly. 

>> Read more trending news

“Should a customer be able to open and close the door with these conditions, the door may appear closed, but the latch may not fully engage the door striker with the potential that the door could open while driving, increasing the risk of injury,” Ford said.

Reuters reported that Ford spokeswoman Elizabeth Weigandt said those who have the affected vehicles should get a notice next month. She did not have a time frame for when parts would be available, according to Reuters.

“We take the safety of our customers very seriously. Our decisions are driven by the data available,” Weigandt said in an email to Forbes. “When the data indicates a safety recall is needed, we move quickly on behalf of our customers.”

Dealers will inspect door latch actuation cables, which could be bent or kinked without the shields, and repair them at no cost if needed. Dealers will also install water shields over the door latches at no cost to the customer.

The company said it is not aware of injuries or accidents tied to the issue. 

More information can be found at the Ford Motor Co. website.

Off-duty Uber driver kidnapped woman, touched her inappropriately, police say

An off-duty Uber driver is accused of kidnapping a passenger in Pennsylvania.

>> Watch the news report here

The woman was standing at Seventh and Penn Avenue in downtown Pittsburgh on Saturday night, waiting for an Uber she had requested.

A car pulled up with an Uber sticker on it so she got in, but not with the driver she was expecting.

Police in West View say Soumana Dao picked her up even though he wasn't on-duty and wasn't her assigned Uber driver.

>> Read more trending news 

Dao started driving north on Interstate 279 toward his home on Center Avenue in West View, according to police, not toward hers in the South Hills.

Police say he also started touching her inappropriately.

A neighbor heard the woman in distress and stepped in to help her, according to police.

A representative for Uber told WPXI that Dao is a driver but wasn't on a trip that night and has since been removed from the app.

The ride-sharing company also advises paying attention to who is picking you up and what car they'll be in.

75 percent of workplace harassment victims who complain face retaliation, study finds

comprehensive study conducted in 2016  by the United States Equal Employment Opportunity Commission uncovered some troubling truths about harassment in the workplace.

» RELATED: Sexual harassment in the workplace: What is it, how to report it and more you should know

In a preface to the report, EEOC co-chairs wrote the number of harassment complaints the team receives every year is still striking 30 years after the U.S. Supreme Court recognized sexual harassment as a form of discrimination under Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

>> Read more trending news

“We present this report with a firm, and confirmed, belief that too many people in too many workplaces find themselves in unacceptably harassing situations when they are simply trying to do their jobs,” the co-chairs wrote.

» RELATED: #MeToo: Women share harrowing accounts of sexual assault, harassment

The EEOC selected a 16-member team from a variety of disciplines and regions to be part of the Select Task Force on the Study of Harassment in the Workplace, to conduct an 18-month study in which they heard from more than 30 witnesses and received numerous public comments.

Here are some of the report’s key findings about workplace harassment: 

It’s still a problem.

Nearly one-third of the 90,000 charges EEOC received in 2015 included an allegation of workplace harassment, according to the report.

» RELATED: After defending Harvey Weinstein, director Oliver Stone accused of sexual assault by Playboy model

It too often goes unreported.

Roughly three out of four victims of harassment spoke to a supervisor or representative about the harassment.

It’s also common, the report found, for those who experience harassment to either ignore and avoid the harasser, downplay the situation, try to forget the harassment or endure it.

“Employees who experience harassment fail to report the harassing behavior or to file a complaint because they fear disbelief of their claim, inaction on their claim, blame, or social or professional retaliation,” report authors wrote.

» RELATED: Jane Fonda on Harvey Weinstein: ‘I’m ashamed I didn’t say anything’

Anywhere between 25-85 percent of women reported sex-based harassment.

Using testimonies and academic articles, analysts dug deeper into the widely divergent numbers.

They found that when asked if they experienced “sexual harassment” without defining the term, 25 percent of women reported they had.

The rate grew to 40 percent when employees were asked about specific unwanted sex-based behaviors.

And when respondents were asked similar questions in surveys using convenience samples, or people who are easy to reach, such as student volunteers, the incidence rate rose to 75 percent, researchers found.

» RELATED: Harvey Weinstein booted from film academy

“Based on this consistent result, researchers have concluded that many individuals do not label certain forms of unwelcome sexually based behaviors – even if they view them as problematic or offensive – as ‘sexual harassment,’” authors wrote.

More men are reporting workplace sexual assault.

According to the EEOC, reports of men experiencing workplace sexual assault have nearly doubled between 1990 and 2009 and now account for 8 to 16 percent of all claims.

» RELATED: Sexual harassment in the workplace: What is it, how to report it and more you should know

Seventy-five percent of harassment victims faced retaliation when they came forward.

The EEOC report noted the results of a 2003 study, which found “75 percent of employees who spoke out against workplace mistreatment faced some form of retaliation.”

Victims often avoid reporting the harassment, because they feel it’s the most “reasonable” course of action, another researcher found.

Indifference or trivialization in the organization, according to the report, can harm the victim “in terms of adverse job repercussions and psychological distress.”

These are just some of the risk factors associated with workplace harassment:

  • Workplaces with lack of diversity in terms of gender, race or ethnicity, age
  • Workplaces with extreme diversity
  • Workplaces with many young workers
  • Workplaces with significant power disparities, such as companies with executives, military member, plant managers
  • Service industries that rely on customer service or client satisfaction
  • Workplaces with monotonous or low-intensity tasks

In addition to being plain wrong, there’s a business case for stopping and preventing harassment.

The EEOC report found there are a multitude of financial costs associated with harassment complaints, such as time and resources dealing with litigation, settlements and damages.

Harassment can also lead to decreased workplace performance and productivity, reputational harm and increased turnover rates.

But the bottom line, according to the report, is: “Employers should care about preventing harassment because it is the right thing to do, and because stopping illegal harassment is required of them.”

You can read the full report at eeoc.gov.

10 ways to keep your spirits up during a job search

Job hunting can be a tenuous, frustrating process. Endless rounds of leads and interviews that never go anywhere are exhausting.

>> Read more trending news

How do you keep going when you’re feeling constantly rejected?

Here are 10 tips for job seekers:

1. Determine the worst-case scenario

How bad can it get? If you think it over, in nearly all cases, this outcome is not as bad as you initially thought.

Think out a plan to overcome your potential obstacles. Determine the rewards of your desired outcome and strive for them by executing your plan through both the ups and downs.

2. Don’t make it personal

It’s easy to start thinking it’s you, not them. You wonder what others have that you don’t. You wonder what you need to fix that others don’t.

Try to keep your perspective, and remember that there are many reasons it may not have worked out. Maybe the position was filled by an internal candidate. Maybe your interviewer had an off-day, which tainted his or her opinion of you during the interview.

“No” isn’t a judgment against you – it’s just something that happens.

3. It’s a process

The idea that someone is going to pick you off the street and hand you a job in which you will make tons of money and be perfectly satisfied is a lovely idea. However, it doesn’t generally work like that. It’s a process.

Commit to take meaningful steps through that process, including applying for jobs both in and out of your comfort zone, working your contacts and being prepared for rejections.

4. Build your enthusiasm for each job

Ask yourself one question when you’re scanning job listings – can I get excited by this job? If you’re not excited or confident about your ability to produce great results for potential employers, do not expect them to be excited and confident about potentially hiring you.

Employers are looking for problem-solvers who can help their firms make and/or save money. Honest enthusiasm will help fuel your pitch.

5. Give yourself a break

It can feel oppressive if you’re under pressure to find a new job. The constant strain can affect the way you sleep, the way your body digests food and your emotional state.

Give yourself permission to take a night or weekend off from applying. Dig into a favorite book or movie, and return to the job hunt rejuvenated.

6. Overcome your fears

If you are afraid of blowing the few job leads you may have because you do not know what to say to a potential employer, are not confident in your abilities to generate value and so on, do not use these fears as reasons to do nothing. You can overcome these worries with some practice.

For example, identify 5-10 companies you would never work for and use them to practice creating your own job market. If you can build up a reasonable argument why these companies should hire you, you’ll be ready for the companies that do want to hire you.

7. Adjust your strategy

If you’re not getting good results, try changing your strategy. This could mean developing an alternate resume or cover letter, or hiring someone to write one for you. You can also spread out into professional groups and do more face-to-face networking.

8. Combat isolation

An unexpected impact of a long, tough job hunt can be isolation — feeling distant and alone in your struggles while your friends and family go on with their regular lives.

An important part of finding your way through the job hunt is realizing that you don’t have to do it alone. Try bouncing some cover letters around with friends or old colleagues. Maybe ask someone to make an introduction. Look into meeting with a career advisor.

The important thing is to make connections.

9. Exercise and give back

Job seekers should exercise to counter stress, bad moods, low energy levels, and potential depression that can result from the job search.

RELATED: If you don’t work out and want to start, here’s how to create an exercise routine in 8 easy steps

Also give back by helping others or volunteering. The benefits of volunteering include a reduction in stress, physical pain and depression. It also increases the endorphin level, which helps people literally feel a rush of joy inside.

10. Take care of your finances

Sometimes, the only way to reassert control of your life is going out and spending money. That’ll end badly if you’re between jobs, though.

Don’t ignore a worsening financial situation; suck it up and deal with it. Look at how you can downsize, or consider getting a short-term job to keep your finances ticking while you keep looking for something long-term.

Keeping the basics covered in your life will help you stay as relaxed as possible and keep your mind on the job hunt.

RELATED: These 7 red flags in the workplace may be signs you’re about to lose your job

Reports of exploding sunroofs on the rise

Sunroofs are shattering above people as they drive down roads.

>> Watch the news report here

A new Consumer Reports investigation says the problem is more common than first thought.

The group says the National Highway Transportation Safety Administration received at least 859 complaints over the last two decades, and most complaints are from the last few years.

They say part of the problem could be the type of glass in sunroofs.

Sunroofs are often made with tempered glass, not laminated glass.

"The glass in these sunroofs is not what's being used in your windshield, where if a rock hits it, it doesn't shatter,” said David Friedman with the Consumer's Union.

>> Read more trending news 

KIRO-TV’s Jesse Jones investigated the problem in 2015. He spoke with a man, Tyler Moody, who was driving when his sunroof exploded.

“I literally thought there was a gunshot,” Moody recalled. “Glass just shattered. The front right here kind of fell down and hit me in the head.”

Mood is one of many people who’ve had the sunroof of their Hyundai Veloster shatter spontaneously. 

Currently, Hyundai tops the list of vehicles with complaints. Ford and Nissan round out the top three.

Consumer Reports found many complaints involve sunroofs that cover a vehicle's entire roof.

There have only been minor injuries with the shattered sunroofs, but experts think more needs to be done to make sure vehicles are safe.

Sexual harassment in the workplace: What is it, how to report it and more you should know

A New York Times investigation last week revealed decades of sexual misconduct allegations against Hollywood mogul Harvey Weinstein.

» RELATED: Timeline of Weinstein allegations dating back decade

Since the report, more than 20 more women, including actresses Rose McGowan, Angelina Jolie and Gwyneth Paltrow, have been vocal about Weinstein’s inappropriate advances.

>> Read more trending news 

In a tweet directed at Amazon exec Jeff Bezos Thursday, McGowan wrote she repeatedly told his head of studios not to work with Weinstein. “HW raped me,” she wrote.

» RELATED: Many #WomenBoycottTwitter to support Rose McGowan, others criticize campaign for ‘silencing’ women

Weinstein was fired from The Weinstein Company on Sunday.

Sexual harassment is not uncommon in the workplace. In a 2015 survey of 2,235 full-time and part-time female employees, Cosmopolitan found 1 in 3 women experienced sexual harassment at work at some point in their lives.

Here’s what you should know about sexual harassment in the workplace, according to the United States Equal Employment Opportunity Commission and Department of Labor:

What is sexual harassment?

Generally, sexual harassment is a form of sex discrimination. It violates Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, which prohibits discrimination in the workplace on the basis of sex, race, color, national origin and religion.

Title VII applies to employers with 15 or more employees.

» RELATED: Harvey Weinstein’s wife Georgina Chapman leaving him amid sexual harassment allegations

According to the Department of Labor, there are two forms of sexual harassment:

  • Quid pro quo: Involves an employment decision based on submission to the sexual harassment, such as promotion, assignment or keeping your job
  • Hostile work environment: Sexual harassment makes workplace hostile, intimidating, abusive or offensive

Are there state laws with more protections against sexual harassment in addition to Title VII?

Some states have adopted stronger protections. Georgia is not one of them. 

Harassment can include, but is not limited to:

  • unwelcome sexual advances
  • requests for sexual favors
  • other verbal or physical harassment of a sexual nature
  • non-sexual but offensive remarks about a person’s sex

Harassment is illegal when:

  • conduct is unwelcome
  • conduct is “based on the victim’s protected status”
  • subjectively abusive to person affected
  • “severe and pervasive” enough to create a work environment that a “reasonable person” would find hostile

What factors are used to determine of harassment is “severe and pervasive” enough?

  • frequency of unwelcome conduct
  • severity of conduct
  • whether conduct was physically threatening/humiliating or “mere offensive utterance”
  • where conduct “unreasonably” interfered with work performance
  • effect on employee’s psychological well-being
  • whether harasser was a superior at the organization

From the Department of Labor:

Each factor is considered, but none are required or dispositive. Hostile work environment cases are often difficult to recognize, because the particular facts of each situation determine whether offensive conduct has crossed the line from “ordinary tribulations of the workplace, such as the sporadic use of abusive language . . . and occasional teasing,” to unlawful harassment.

However, the intent of the Department of Labor's Harassing Conduct Policy is to provide a process for addressing incidents of unwelcome conduct long before they become severe and pervasive enough to create a hostile work environment under the law.

Does the gender of the victim or harasser matter?

No. Both the victim and harasser can be either a woman or a man — or both can be the same sex.

» RELATED: Student says Georgia university did little to stop sexual harassment

Does the title of the harasser matter?

No. The harasser can be the victim’s supervisor, a supervisor in another department, a coworker, an employee of a separate employer, a client or a customer.

What about teasing?

According to the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, the law doesn’t prohibit simple teasing, offhand comments or isolated incidents that are “not very serious.”

However, teasing becomes illegal when:

  • the behavior becomes frequent or severe
  • the behavior creates a hostile or offensive work environment
  • the behavior results in an adverse employment decision (victim is fired or demoted)

What if you weren’t directly harassed but you feel affected?

You do not have to be the victim of direct harassment to be affected by the offensive conduct. It is still considered sexual harassment, according to the EEOC.

What should you do if you experience sexual harassment?

Inform the harasser at once that the behavior is unwelcome, then directly use “any employer complaint mechanism or grievance system available.” 

This may include reaching out to your direct manager or employer or talking to your company’s human resources department. Check your employee handbook for more information.

If you really can’t find someone you trust, labor and law employment attorney Nannina Angioni suggests you contact the Department of Fair Employment and Housing.

Experts also recommend filing a complaint with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission. Find directions on the EEOC’s website.

You may also want to continue keeping a record of the discriminatory activity and seek support from friends and family.

What if speaking out is too difficult?

“Some victims will never report abuse, and they have that right,” psychologist Nekeshia Hammond told NBC News. “It’s a case by case thing, and sometimes there’s a reason for staying silent — if you feel your safety is threatened, or if you’re literally on the verge of having an emotional breakdown and will be unable to function. But you need to reach out to someone.”

Hammond recommends calling the National Sexual Assault Hotline at 1-800-656-HOPE (4673), which includes free services and confidential support.

Can staying silent work against me, legally?

According to the Department of Labor, “the department cannot correct harassing conduct if a supervisor, manager or other Department official does not become aware of it.”

In fact, when an employee “unreasonably fails to report harassing conduct,” the department can use this as a defense against a suit for harassment.

Additionally, if you file a complaint with the EEOC, it’s recommended you do so within 180 days of the discriminatory activity.

» RELATED: Woman says she lost work hours after reporting sexual harassment

How does the EEOC investigate allegations of sexual harassment?

The department looks at the circumstances of the misconduct, the nature of the sexual advances and the context in which the incidents allegedly occurred.

“A determination on the allegations is made from the facts on a case-by-case basis,” the EEOC website states.

How can companies stop sexual harassment from occurring?

According to the EEOC, prevention is the best tool. Employers should be vocal about the intolerance of sexual harassment and establish a complaint and grievance system.

Learn more about workplace sexual harassment at dol.gov and eeoc.gov.

200 items
Results 21 - 30 of 200 < previous next >