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Top 25 highest paying jobs in America

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A new report by Glassdoor says 68 percent of people who participated in a survey consider salary and compensation among the most important factors when deciding where to work. 

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It's no surprise that physicians, lawyers and research and development managers bring home the biggest paychecks, but the career site points out that the highest-paying jobs don't always have the highest job satisfaction.

“This report reinforces that high pay continues to be tied to in-demand skills, higher education and working in jobs that are protected from competition or automation. This is why we see several jobs within the technology and health care industries,” said Dr. Andrew Chamberlain, Glassdoor Chief Economist. “There’s no doubt that pay is among the leading factors most job seekers weigh when determining where to work. However, our research shows that a big paycheck isn’t necessarily tied to long-term satisfaction in your job. Instead, when we dig deeper into what keeps employees satisfied once they’re in a job and with a company, we find that culture and values, career opportunities, and trust in senior leadership are the biggest drivers of employee satisfaction.”

Here are the top 25 jobs that offer the highest salaries based on information from people who have shared their salaries on Glassdoor over the past year:

1. Physician

Median Base Salary: $180,000

2. Lawyer

Median Base Salary: $144,500

3. Research and Development Manager

Median Base Salary: $142,120

4. Software Development Manager

Median Base Salary: $132,000

5. Pharmacy Manager

Median Base Salary: $130,000

6. Strategy Manager

Median Base Salary: $130,000

7. Software Architect

Median Base Salary: $128,250

8. Integrated Circuit Designer Engineer

Median Base Salary: $127,500

9. IT Manager

Median Base Salary: $120,000

10. Solutions Architect

Median Base Salary: $120,000

11. Engagement Manager

Median Base Salary: $120,000

12. Applications Development Manager

Median Base Salary: $120,000

13. Pharmacist

Median Base Salary: $118,000

14. Systems Architect

Median Base Salary: $116,920

15. Finance Manager

Median Base Salary: $115,000

16. Data Scientist

Median Base Salary: $115,000

17. Risk Manager

Median Base Salary: $115,000

18. Creative Director

Median Base Salary: $115,000

19. Actuary

Median Base Salary: $115,000

20. Data Architect

Median Base Salary: $113,000

21. Tax Manager

Median Base Salary: $110,000

22. Product Manager

Median Base Salary: $107,000

23. Design Manager

Median Base Salary: $106,500

24. Analytics Manager

Median Base Salary: $106,000

25. Information Systems Manager

Median Base Salary: $106,000

Report ranks hardest-working cities in America

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A new report examines which U.S. cities host residents with the best work ethics.

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In honor of Employee Appreciation Day on March 4, Wallethub ranked 116 U.S. cities based on factors such as number of workers with multiple jobs, average weekly work hours and commute time. Each city was given a total score out of 100.

The study found that Anchorage, Alaska, is the hardest-working city in America. Anchorage’s score of 88.42 ranked eight points higher than the second hardest-working city, Virginia Beach, Virginia.

Burlington, Vermont, was ranked the laziest, or least hard working, coming in with a score of 18.66.

Here are the top 10 hardest working U.S. cities, according to Wallethub: 

1. Anchorage, Alaska

2. Virginia Beach, Virginia

3. Plano, Texas

4. Sioux Falls, South Dakota

5. Irving, Texas

6. Scottsdale, Arizona

7. San Francisco, California

8. Cheyenne, Wyoming

9. Washington, D.C.

10. Charlotte, North Carolina

Read more and see the full list here.

You could probably get your old job back

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Would you consider going back to a former employer? If you’re like most American workers responding to a recent survey, you wouldn’t. A full 52 percent of respondents to the Accountemps staffing firm’s survey said they likely would not. But the same can’t be said for former employers. Nearly all -- 98 percent -- of human resources managers interviewed said they would welcome back a previous employee who left on good terms. The survey did not provide statistics regarding employees who left on bad terms.

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For employers, the benefits of rehiring a valued former employee can be pretty obvious.

“Boomerang employees have a shorter learning curve and may require less training and have already proven themselves and their fit with the organization, so there are fewer surprises,” Bill Driscoll, a district president for Accountemps, said in a statement. “Companies who part ways unprofessionally or don’t take seriously the information they glean from exit interviews could miss out on bringing back someone great.”

Most employees, however, rarely leave jobs they’re happy with. The top reason employees gave for leaving a former employer was that they didn’t like the management (23 percent). Not liking the corporate culture was the second most common response (14 percent), tied with not liking their job duties. And 10 percent of employees said they wouldn’t consider returning because the company burned bridges when they left.

The surveys were conducted by independent research firms. They included responses from more than 300 HR managers at U.S. companies with 20 or more employees and more than 1,000 U.S. workers 18 years or older and employed in office environments.

“When it comes to rehiring former employees, consider why they left in the first place. If they resigned to pursue education, training or a role with more responsibility, having them back may bring new skills and ideas to the organization,” Driscoll said. “On the other hand, those who quit because of dissatisfaction with management, pay or the corporate culture may still be unhappy if they perceive nothing has changed while they were away.”

Record number of Americans apply to be astronauts

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More than 18,000 people applied to be an astronaut during the last two months. 

That's nearly three times the number of applications received in 2012 for the most recent astronaut class and more than two times the amount received in 1978 -- which previously held the record amount of applicants when 8,000 people applied for the position.

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“It’s not at all surprising to me that so many Americans from diverse backgrounds want to personally contribute to blazing the trail on our journey to Mars,” said former astronaut and current NASA administrator Charlie Bolden. “A few exceptionally talented men and women will become the astronauts chosen in this group who will once again launch to space from U.S. soil on American-made spacecraft.”

NASA's Astronaut Selection Board will select and announce eight to 14 individuals in mid-2017. The new astronauts will train at Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas, where they'll complete about two years of initial training on spacecraft systems, spacewalking skills and teamwork, Russian language and other skills.

Applications for the 2017 astronaut class opened Dec. 14, and closed Thursday.

“We have our work cut out for us with this many applications,” said Brian Kelly, director of flight operations at Johnson Space Center. “But it’s heartening to know so many people recognize what a great opportunity this is to be part of NASA’s exciting mission. I look forward to meeting the men and women talented enough to rise to the top of what is always a pool of incredible applicants.”

Read more here.

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26 baby names that spell career success

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All parents want their children to grow up into happy adults who make a positive impact in society. Some stress, more than others, the importance of becoming successful.

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MooseRoots wanted to see which names are most common among CEOs, COOs, VPs and presidents today at major U.S. companies. With help from FindTheCompany, they found the top 26 male and female executive names and organized them by popularity.

According to FindTheCompany, the average age of an executive in the U.S. is 53-and-a-half, so the Atlanta Journal-Constitution took a close look at how each of these names ranked in 1962.

While many of the male executive names are still popular, most of the female names have dwindled, and there are many more male executives in the U.S. than female. Even still, there are just as many baby girl names to choose from on this list.

Select a timeless name here that commands respect -- perhaps you’ll select one based off a favorite innovator or leader.

26. Carol

Carol was the 28th most popular name in 1962. Among executives in 2014, however, it was No. 13.

Carol is an English name which means “strong, free man.”

One Carol who is no doubt free and strong is Carol M. Meyrowitz. She is the president, chief executive officer and director of TJX Companies. She made a reported $28.7 million in 2014, the same year Forbes listed her as the 76th most powerful woman in the world.

25. Steven

Steven was quite common in the U.S. in the 1950s and ’60s, and that is why there are at least 1,227 executives named Steven today.

The CEOs of Qualcomm, Metlife, Bed Bath & Beyond and Suncor Energy all share the English name that means “crown.” Of course, we should also mention the quintessential CEO and pop culture icon Steve Jobs.

24. Jennifer

Jennifer was the name of the 1970s, ranking first for the whole decade, but was fairly common in the 1960s as well. According to FindTheCompany, there were 125 women named Jennifer with executive positions in 2014.

For parents interested in the name, it’s important to know that Jennifer not only means “white wave,” it is a Cornish variation on the name “Guinevere,” King Arthur’s infamous wife.

23. Peter

Peter has never been a top 10 or even top 20 name in the U.S., but managed to come in at No. 12 for executive males.

There are plenty of whimsical Peters, including Peter Pan and Peter Rabbit, but the CEOs of giants such as Johnson & Johnson, Marsh & McLennan and Fortress Investment Group are named Peter as well.

22. Deborah

Deborah has seriously fallen off the radar in recent years, but in the 1950s and ’60s Deborah was all the rage. The name means “bee” and many of these executives certainly need a sting to thrive in such a competitive atmosphere.

The most notable executive named Deborah is Deborah Lloyd, an executive officer of Kate Spade. She was one of the highest earners (among females) in 2014, earning $25 million.

21. Joseph

Unlike some of these names that have fallen into obscurity, Joseph has remained popular in the U.S. and Europe. In 2014, FindTheCompany listed 1,306 executives named Joseph in the U.S.

We may have a future mogul named Joseph, as Ivanka Trump chose the name for her son in 2013.

20. Kathleen

Kathleen dropped slightly in popularity in the 1960s and was the 29th most popular girls name in 1962.

Still, many powerful women today share the name, including Kathleen Barclay, VP of Kroger; Kathleen Philips, COO of Zillow; and Kathleen M. Benning, executive VP of Buffalo Wild Wings.

19. Paul

While Paul was more popular in the 1950s and ’60s than it is today, it never reached top 10 status in the U.S. However, it did rank in 10th place for executive names in 2014.

The name means “small,” but also commemorates Saint Paul, remembered as one of the founders of Christianity.

18. Mark

From 1955 until 1970, Mark was a top 10 name in the U.S. It has since slowed in popularity, ranking at No. 189 in 2014, but the Biblical name meaning “warlike” or “horse” appears at the top of some of the most influential companies in the world.

Oracle, Goldman Sachs, Ford, Nike and Exxon Mobile all have Marks in very high positions.

17. Nancy

Nancy was not a top 10 name in the 1960s, but ranked ninth as an executive name in 2014.

The name means “grace,” and it undoubtedly takes someone who is graceful under pressure to obtain such a high-ranked position.

16. Patricia

It is fitting that Patricia is the eighth-most popular female executive name, as it ranked in the top 10 throughout the 1960s.

There are some powerful executives today named Patricia, including Patricia Ann Woertz, president and CEO of Archer Daniels Midland; and Patricia E. Yarrington, a vice president and CFO of Chevron. These women earned salaries of $17 million and $10 million in 2014, respectively.

15. Richard

It’s very fitting that Richard means “dominant ruler,” as there have been quite a few influential Richards throughout history, including King Richard the Lionheart and Richard Nixon.

Top executives named Richard include Richard Fairbank, the CEO of Capital One Financial; and Richard Branson, the colorful founder of Virgin Group.

14. Lisa

Along with Mary, Lisa was the “it” name in the 1960s and early 1970s. It was the most popular name in 1962, and 144 executives were named Lisa in 2014.

13. Thomas

The name Thomas has always been popular in the U.S. and Europe. Thomas Jefferson, Thomas Edison and even Thomas the Tank Engine have given this name notoriety.

Of course, the name is common in the business world as well; there were 2,353 executives named Thomas in the U.S. in 2014.

12. Barbara

In the 1950s and ’60s, Barbara was an incredibly common name, ranking 14th in 1962. Today, it falls in sixth place for female executive names.

Barbara means “foreign woman,” but has become somewhat dated, as the most well-known Barbaras are Barbara Walters and Barbara Bush.

11. William

William has always been a common choice among parents for boys, and currently executives named William are leading a vast array of companies. From Kate Spade to Raytheon and Apple, Williams are a diverse bunch.

10. Elizabeth

Unlike the proceeding top four female names that have fallen out of popularity, Elizabeth is still a very common name, ranking at No. 14 in 2014.

It is important to note that while Elizabeth did not rank in the top 10 in popularity in the 1960s (No. 20 in 1962), it ranks fifth for top executive names. The top-earning CEO named Elizabeth in 2014 was Elizabeth Smith, the CEO of Bloomin’ Brands. She took home $6.21 million in 2014.

9. James

The popularity of the name James 50 years ago closely parallels the number of executives named James today. The Hebrew name means “supplanter,” and there were 3,423 male executives named James in 2014.

The name might soon increase in popularity for girls, considering stars Ryan Reynolds and Blake Lively recently chose James for their baby girl.

8. Linda

Linda means “pretty,” but many female executives named Linda are more than just a pretty face, having worked extremely hard to become successful.

Some notable executives named Linda include Linda Chen, the subsidiary president of Wynn Resorts; and Linda Lang, the former CEO of Jack in the Box.

7. Michael

Like David, Michael is another name that remains popular throughout the years. It was the most popular name in the U.S. in 1962, and has not fallen below the top 10 since 1942.

One of the wealthiest people on this list, Michael T. Fries, the CEO and president of Liberty Global, took in $112 million in 2014.

6. Karen

Karen is a name of Scandinavian origin that means “pure.” During the baby boom, the name reached No. 3 in popularity in 1960, so it is fitting that there are 191 executives named Karen today, according to FindTheCompany.

Perhaps the most well-known executive named Karen is Karen Kaplan, the CEO of the Boston-based marketing agency Hill Holiday.

5. David

David consistently ranked in the top five in popularity in the U.S. in the early 1960s. Therefore, it is no surprise that David is the third most common male executive name. Although it is a classic name, David remains popular today and ranked at No. 18 in 2014.

One of the highest-earning Davids is David M. Zaslav, the CEO and president of Discovery Communications. He made a whopping $156 million in 2014.

4. Susan

Although the name has dropped off in recent decades, Susan was a top choice for parents in the 1960s. It was the third most popular name in 1962 and today is the second most popular executive name for females.

Susan is a strong Hebrew name that means “graceful lily.”

3. Robert

Robert ranked in the top 10 in the U.S. from 1880 until 1990, when popularity eventually waned.

The Norman name means “famed, bright and shining,” and there are many skillful executives named Robert. Companies including Time Warner Cable, Las Vegas Sands and Comcast are all run by gentlemen named Robert.

2. Mary

Mary was the No. 1 name for females in the U.S. from the early 1900s until 1962, when it fell to No. 2.

Because Mary was such a popular name in the 1960s, it is not surprisingly that many top executives share the name today. Perhaps the most well known is Mary Barra, the CEO of GM.

1. John

The name John ranked in the top 10 in the U.S. until 1987, and such a popular name is bound to have success stories in every field, including business. John is by far the most popular executive name in the U.S.

There were 4,698 executives named John in the U.S. in 2014. This March, the "New York Times" published a slightly distressing article titled “Fewer Women Run Big Companies Than Men Named John.”

4 strange ways people make money online

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The Internet is a great place to launch entrepreneurial efforts. Some people have made money by creating useful products and functional websites, while others have found ways to make money in creative and interesting, yet strange, ways.

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Here is a sampling of some unusual online commerce:

1. Online Eating – Mukbang, a combination of Korean words that mean eating and broadcasting, is quite popular in South Korea. Viewers tune in to chat and watch people eat, and donate cash-redeemable "star balloons" to the eaters. According to a Business Insider video, the most-viewed eater on the streaming service Afreeca TV earned a whopping $250,000 in 2013. "Gastro voyeurs" have around 3,500 online eaters to choose from, some of whom are sponsored by restaurants. So instead of “What do you want to eat tonight?” the question is, “Whom do you want to watch eat tonight?”

2. Facial Advertising – Two men from Great Britain hit upon the idea of paying off their student debt in a creative way — selling space on their face. Using only a makeup pencil, Ross Harper and Ed Moyse sold daily advertising space on their face for a full year. After initial sales at only a few dollars, the site caught on and the two ended up selling space for $600.

The catch was that the duo would film themselves doing stunts or other attention-getting actions (some requested and paid for by the client) and post the results on their website, Buymyface.com, which in turn directed traffic to the client's website. They managed to retire nearly $60,000 of their $80,000 debt before shutting the site down.

3. Selling Shares in Yourself – Mike Merrill decided in 2008 to divide himself into 100,000 shares and offer himself as an IPO of sorts for $1 per share. Shares can be purchased at his website, which embraces "community through capitalism." Shareholders do not receive money or dividends in return, but they can log in to cast votes on aspects of Merrill's everyday life, such as whether or not he should invest in a Rwandan chicken farm or get a vasectomy.

As of this writing, the last vote was to "produce a live theatre production exploring the issues of identity and celebrity" with the title of "Understanding Jason Bateman." Bateman is allegedly set to star in a movie being made about Merrill's life. Just another case of life imitating art imitating life.

4. Wearing T-Shirts – The advertising principle strikes again with Iwearyourshirt.com. The site is no longer around, but its owner, Jason Sadler, made serious money by wearing T-shirts with a different company logo each day. In his first year, Sadler made $70,000 — and ended up making as much as $500,000 a year, by some reports. At one point, Sadler had a team of five T-shirt wearers, or human billboards, spread throughout the country and a client base that included Nissan and Starbucks. To increase the advertising value, Sadler posted videos of himself on various social media sites discussing his client of the day.

Sadler has moved on to other ventures but continues to dabble in the world of unique methods of making money. He has legally changed his name twice for advertising money. Auctioning off his name in 2012 earned him $45,000 and the name Jason HeadsetsDotCom. In 2013, he became Jason Surfrapp.com for $50,000. He has most recently changed his last name to Zook, but that was for personal, not professional, reasons.

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Intern falls asleep on second day of work, memes go viral

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Sometimes, it's hard to keep your eyes open while you're at work, especially if it's on a Monday. 

Even still, most people make serious efforts to be fully engaged and productive within their first few weeks at a company. 

It's a chance to prove that you're a valuable, hardworking employee and that the business made a smart decision by hiring you. 

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But one college-aged intern fell asleep on the job -- on his second day.

Eduard Paraschivescu, who interns for GSoft Technologies, a tech startup in Montreal, said he was sleeping so hard, someone had to check his pulse to make sure he was still alive.

"Apparently, for the entire 25 (that) I was sleeping, (my coworkers) were laughing, they were dropping boxes next to me," Paraschivescu told CTV Network.

His employees took a group selfie with the college student and posted it to the company's Facebook for laughs. But none of them -- or Paraschivescu -- would've guessed it'd blow up in the way it did.

According to CNN, the photo landed on a Reddit page called Photoshop Battles. From there, the photo was manipulated into dozens of scenarios with Paraschivescu's sleeping face.

"I could've done a million other things to get known at the company rather than that," Paraschivescu said. 

But he's not worried that his unplanned nap will have dire consequences. 

"It's one of their company statements having fun at work, and (the other workers) did " he said.

Paraschivescu said he has anemia, which causes him to fall asleep easily, but now, in an effort to avoid the embarrassing incident again, he'll keep many forms of caffeine on his desk. 

Et oui, c'est arrivé chez GSOFT.En passant, on recrute d'autres stagiaires...#yesimatworkPosted by GSOFT on Thursday, February 4, 2016

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Bill Gates memorized employees' license plate numbers to monitor their work hours

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Billionaire businessowner Bill Gates recently told BBC radio program "Desert Island Discs" that he had an interesting way of tracking his employees' hours: he used to memorize their license plates to monitor their comings and goings.

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"I had to be a little careful not to try and apply my standards to how hard they worked," he said. "I knew everyone's license plates so I could look out in the parking lot and see when did people come in, when were they leaving. Eventually I had to loosen up as the company got to a reasonable size."

Gates said he was "a little more intense than most people" in the way that he ran Microsoft but "no more intense" than Apple co-founder Steve Jobs. 

Gates, who dropped out of Harvard University at 19 to start Microsoft with Paul Allen in 1975, stepped down as the CEO of the software company in 2000 and stepped down as the company’s chairman in 2014. He is now co-chair of the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation.

During the interview, the 60-year-old described the relationship he had with Jobs as a close one. 

"For some periods, we were completely allies working together; I wrote software for the original Apple II," he said. "Sometimes he would be very tough on you, (and) sometimes he'd be very encouraging. He got really great work out of people." 

He continued: "In the early years, the intensity had always been about the project, and so then (when) Steve got sick, it was far more mellow in terms of talking about our lives and our kids. Steve was an incredible genius, and I was more of an engineer than he was. It was fun. It was more of a friendship that was reflective."

Legoland is hiring for the job of your dreams

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Many children dream of being a doctor, lawyer or scientist when they grow up. 

But what if they knew they could play with toys and get paid for it?

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A new Legoland factory called the Merlin Magic Making Hub held its grand opening last week near the company's theme park and resort in Winter Haven, Florida. Merlin Entertainment, Legoland's parent company, is looking to hire at least 20 model builders and designers for Lego creations around the world.

"It's a brand new production facility to make Lego models for Merlin attractions all around the world," Ryan Wood, the model shop supervisor, told Fox 13. "The kind of models we make here are typically for mini-land attractions within the Legoland and Legoland Discovery Center parks."

Models are often of people, animals and popular sites.

The Florida factory, which had its grand opening last week, has already hired 50 model builders for its staff. 

"This is definitely very much a dream job," said Legoland model builder Max Petrosky. "When you're a kid, you play with Lego, you know? To actually make a living, actually working with Lego, it's just really incredible."

The job, which only requires a high school diploma, is described as follows

"This individual builds LEGO models in our off-site Model Shop- MMM Studios. Must have LEGO building experience and be able to design and build sturdy, accurate, complicated, safe and installable LEGO models for a wide variety of LEGOLAND attractions including miniature scale models and/or life sized organic models from prototypes, diagrams or computer generated instructions. This position requires strong communication during design and building of models, good organization during the completion and documentation phases of the projects and a willingness to complete all tasks necessary to creating and installing models and displays.

Requires previous experience in LEGO model building, (architectural and/or sculptural), basic computer knowledge, a good knowledge of LEGO parts, good communication skills, ability to give and receive constructive criticism, ability to work in a team and a positive attitude. Strong focus, concentration, good craftsmanship, patience and a sense of humor are a must. Artistic education, background, or experience helpful but not required."

Legoland has attractions in Denmark, the United Kingdom, United Arab Emirates, Germany and Malaysia.

Ending gender inequality could pay off in the trillions

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What would actually happen if we had worldwide gender equality? Well, one estimate says the global economy would take off.

The director of the McKinsey Global Institute says there would be a $28 trillion boost to the global economy if women and men became equal overnight. That's nearly 1.5 times that of the United States' current economy.

With all that extra money, global government debt could be eliminated. Currently, government debt is estimated at $25 trillion.

>> People in Florida struggle to make ends meet

Researchers studied what would happen if women were as economically involved as men. They looked at factors like job opportunities, leadership positions and wages. The World Economic Forum estimates globally women won't be earning the same as men for another 118 years.

But if countries focused on being as equal as the nation in their region with the least inequality, the boom could still be high, the director also said. We're talking $12 trillion or the total of China's current economy.

The prediction was reiterated at the World Economic Forum's annual meeting in Davos, Switzerland, but even there, women aren't equally represented. This year they made up less than 20 percent of participants.

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