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Backstreet Boys to perform Las Vegas residency

Backstreet will be back — and back and back and back — in Las Vegas.

The pop group Backstreet Boys confirmed reports Friday they will begin a concert residency next year at Planet Hollywood.

"Backstreet Boys: Larger Than Life" will feature members Nick Carter, Howie Dorough, Brian Littrell, AJ McLean and Kevin Richardson.

"We're going to call the show 'Larger Than Life,' and we're taking that theme and we're going to run with it," Richardson said in a statement.

Littrell said the show, which has been initially scheduled to run from March to July, will be like a typical Backstreet Boys concert "on steroids."

The group's first performance will be March 1. Tickets go on sale Oct. 1.

The show will be held in the same theater where Britney Spears and Jennifer Lopez perform their Vegas residencies.

The Backstreet Boys formed in 1993 and are best known for such hits as "I Want It That Way," ''As Long as You Love Me" and "Everybody (Backstreet's Back)."

Backstreet Boys to perform Las Vegas residency

Backstreet will be back — and back and back and back — in Las Vegas.

The pop group Backstreet Boys confirmed reports Friday they will begin a concert residency next year at Planet Hollywood.

"Backstreet Boys: Larger Than Life" will feature members Nick Carter, Howie Dorough, Brian Littrell, AJ McLean and Kevin Richardson.

"We're going to call the show 'Larger Than Life,' and we're taking that theme and we're going to run with it," Richardson said in a statement.

Littrell said the show, which has been initially scheduled to run from March to July, will be like a typical Backstreet Boys concert "on steroids."

The group's first performance will be March 1. Tickets go on sale Oct. 1.

The show will be held in the same theater where Britney Spears and Jennifer Lopez perform their Vegas residencies.

The Backstreet Boys formed in 1993 and are best known for such hits as "I Want It That Way," ''As Long as You Love Me" and "Everybody (Backstreet's Back)."

Obama: African-American museum tells 'story of all of us'

President Barack Obama on Friday celebrated the pending opening of the Smithsonian's new African-American museum and said the institution, decades in the making, is a powerful place because it tells "the story of all of us," not just the famous.

Obama also said he hoped the museum would help people bridge divides that were re-exposed by the latest fatal, police-involved shootings of black men.

The country's first black president, Obama was scheduled to preside over an outdoor ribbon-cutting ceremony Saturday morning for the National Museum of African American History and Culture, which was built on the National Mall in the shadow of the Washington Monument.

"The thing about this museum is that it's ... more than just telling stories about the famous. It's not just about the icons," Obama said at a White House reception celebrating the museum. He added that the museum has plenty of space to feature black icons like Harriet Tubman, Martin Luther King Jr., Muhammad Ali and others.

"What makes the museum so powerful and so visceral is that it's the story of all of us, the folks whose names you never heard of, but whose contributions, day after day, decade after decade, combined to push us forward and the entire nation forward," Obama said, mentioning maids, porters and others who stood up for themselves despite daily assaults on their dignity.

Obama pointed out that the hundreds of people who were invited to the reception in the Grand Foyer included artists Quincy Jones and Phylicia Rashad, astronaut Mae Jemison and Oprah Winfrey, "the woman who owns the universe." Civil rights legends like Rep. John Lewis, D-Ga., and Jesse Jackson attended, along with representatives of a new generation of activists, including DeRay Mckesson of the Black Lives Matter movement.

Everyone in the room can think of an unsung hero, Obama said. "But the point is that all of us cannot forget that the only reason that we're standing here is because somebody, somewhere stood up for us," he said. "Stood up when it was risky. Stood up when it was not popular. And somehow, standing up together, managed to change the world."

Obama said the museum opening this weekend, following the shootings of black men in Tulsa, Oklahoma, and Charlotte, North Carolina, would allow Americans to "put our current circumstances in a historical context."

"My hope is that, as people are seeing what's happened in Tulsa or Charlotte on television, and perhaps are less familiar with not only the history of the African-American experience but also how recent some of these challenges have been, upon visiting the museum, may step back and say: 'I understand. I sympathize. I empathize. I can see why folks might feel angry and I want to be part of the solution as opposed to resisting change,'" the president said.

Obama took his wife, Michelle, their daughters, Malia and Sasha, and his mother-in-law, Marian Robinson, on a behind-the-scenes tour of the museum earlier this month. He and the first lady returned Thursday, where they were interviewed by "Good Morning America" co-host Robin Roberts.

The museum features Obama's groundbreaking presidency. He told Roberts in the interview broadcast Friday by ABC News that the museum put into context his presidency and what he has tried to do for the country, and "explains that we're standing on the shoulders of giants."

He said he and Mrs. Obama were "humbled" to be included but "we think of ourselves as a pretty small part of the story."

Mrs. Obama, the descendant of a slave, said the museum is "one of the few places on earth that tells the complete story of my existence." She said it will be a "point of pride for this nation."

Later Friday, the Obamas attended a performance at the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts that chronicled the experiences of black Americans through song and dance. Patti Austin, Mary J. Blige, Usher, John Legend, Dave Grohl and Dave Chappelle were among those who performed.

___

Follow Darlene Superville on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/dsupervilleap

Obama: African-American museum tells 'story of all of us'

President Barack Obama on Friday celebrated the pending opening of the Smithsonian's new African-American museum and said the institution, decades in the making, is a powerful place because it tells "the story of all of us," not just the famous.

Obama also said he hoped the museum would help people bridge divides that were re-exposed by the latest fatal, police-involved shootings of black men.

The country's first black president, Obama was scheduled to preside over an outdoor ribbon-cutting ceremony Saturday morning for the National Museum of African American History and Culture, which was built on the National Mall in the shadow of the Washington Monument.

"The thing about this museum is that it's ... more than just telling stories about the famous. It's not just about the icons," Obama said at a White House reception celebrating the museum. He added that the museum has plenty of space to feature black icons like Harriet Tubman, Martin Luther King Jr., Muhammad Ali and others.

"What makes the museum so powerful and so visceral is that it's the story of all of us, the folks whose names you never heard of, but whose contributions, day after day, decade after decade, combined to push us forward and the entire nation forward," Obama said, mentioning maids, porters and others who stood up for themselves despite daily assaults on their dignity.

Obama pointed out that the hundreds of people who were invited to the reception in the Grand Foyer included artists Quincy Jones and Phylicia Rashad, astronaut Mae Jemison and Oprah Winfrey, "the woman who owns the universe." Civil rights legends like Rep. John Lewis, D-Ga., and Jesse Jackson attended, along with representatives of a new generation of activists, including DeRay Mckesson of the Black Lives Matter movement.

Everyone in the room can think of an unsung hero, Obama said. "But the point is that all of us cannot forget that the only reason that we're standing here is because somebody, somewhere stood up for us," he said. "Stood up when it was risky. Stood up when it was not popular. And somehow, standing up together, managed to change the world."

Obama said the museum opening this weekend, following the shootings of black men in Tulsa, Oklahoma, and Charlotte, North Carolina, would allow Americans to "put our current circumstances in a historical context."

"My hope is that, as people are seeing what's happened in Tulsa or Charlotte on television, and perhaps are less familiar with not only the history of the African-American experience but also how recent some of these challenges have been, upon visiting the museum, may step back and say: 'I understand. I sympathize. I empathize. I can see why folks might feel angry and I want to be part of the solution as opposed to resisting change,'" the president said.

Obama took his wife, Michelle, their daughters, Malia and Sasha, and his mother-in-law, Marian Robinson, on a behind-the-scenes tour of the museum earlier this month. He and the first lady returned Thursday, where they were interviewed by "Good Morning America" co-host Robin Roberts.

The museum features Obama's groundbreaking presidency. He told Roberts in the interview broadcast Friday by ABC News that the museum put into context his presidency and what he has tried to do for the country, and "explains that we're standing on the shoulders of giants."

He said he and Mrs. Obama were "humbled" to be included but "we think of ourselves as a pretty small part of the story."

Mrs. Obama, the descendant of a slave, said the museum is "one of the few places on earth that tells the complete story of my existence." She said it will be a "point of pride for this nation."

Later Friday, the Obamas attended a performance at the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts that chronicled the experiences of black Americans through song and dance. Patti Austin, Mary J. Blige, Usher, John Legend, Dave Grohl and Dave Chappelle were among those who performed.

___

Follow Darlene Superville on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/dsupervilleap

Guest lineups for the Sunday news shows

Guest lineups for the Sunday TV news shows:

ABC's "This Week" —Trump campaign manager Kellyanne Conway; Clinton campaign manager Robby Mook; Libertarian presidential nominee Gary Johnson; British Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson

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NBC's "Meet the Press" — Listing unavailable.

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CBS' "Face the Nation" — Democratic vice presidential candidate Tim Kaine, Republican vice presidential candidate Mike Pence; House Speaker Paul Ryan, R-Wis., Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt.

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CNN's "State of the Union" —Conway, Mook; Rep. Marsha Blackburn, R-Tenn.

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"Fox News Sunday" — Pence; Joe Benenson, chief strategist for Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton; Librarian of Congress Carla Hayden.

AP Source: Brad Pitt allegations relate to treatment of son

Allegations Brad Pitt was abusive on a private plane last week relate to the actor's treatment of his 15-year-old son, sources said Friday, as the FBI continued to gather information before determining whether to open an investigation.

FBI Spokeswoman Laura Eimiller said the agency hasn't made a decision on a formal investigation into what occurred on a plane ferrying Pitt, his wife Angelina Jolie Pitt and their six children.

Several news outlets have reported that a child welfare agency in Los Angeles is investigating the well-being of the children, who range in ages from 8 to 15.

Sources familiar with the allegations, but not authorized to speak publicly, say the child welfare investigation centers on Pitt's conduct toward his son Maddox, 15, during an argument on the Sept. 14 flight. No law enforcement agency responded to the plane when it landed in Minnesota after the incident.

Amara Suarez, a spokeswoman for the Los Angeles County Department of Children and Family Services, said the agency could not confirm whether it was investigating Pitt or the well-being of the former couple's children.

Calls to the offices of Pitt's attorney, Lance Spiegel, and Jolie Pitt's lawyer, Laura Wasser, were forwarded to recorded messages stating their firms do not comment on clients.

Jolie Pitt filed for divorce Monday and her lawyer released a statement the following day saying she came to the decision "for the health of the family." She listed their separation date as Sept. 15, the day after the alleged plane incident, and the actress is seeking sole custody of all six of the children.

Koochiching County, Minnesota, Sheriff Perryn Hedlund told The Associated Press on Thursday that Brad Pitt was on a plane that landed at the International Falls, Minnesota, airport near the Canadian border on Sept. 14.

Hedlund said his sheriff's deputies were not called to the airport, and International Falls police were also not called.

"There's no incident whatsoever reported to law enforcement," Hedlund said.

He said he didn't know why the plane landed in International Falls, but said it's not uncommon for hockey players or other celebrities to stop at the airport.

Pitt and Jolie Pitt — known as "Brangelina" — were together for 12 years but only wed in August 2014. They married privately at their French chateau in the Provence hamlet of Correns with their children serving as ring bearers and throwing flower petals. They announced the ceremony days later.

Their six children include 15-year-old Maddox, 12-year-old Pax, 11-year-old Zahara, 10-year-old Shiloh, and 8-year-old twins Knox and Vivienne.

This is the second marriage for Pitt, 52, who previously wed Jennifer Aniston. It's the third for Jolie Pitt, 41, who was previously married to Billy Bob Thornton and Jonny Lee Miller.

___

Associated Press Writer Amy Forliti in Minneapolis contributed to this report.

___

Anthony McCartney can be reached at http://twitter.com/mccartneyAP

AP Source: Brad Pitt allegations relate to treatment of son

Allegations Brad Pitt was abusive on a private plane last week relate to the actor's treatment of his 15-year-old son, sources said Friday, as the FBI continued to gather information before determining whether to open an investigation.

FBI Spokeswoman Laura Eimiller said the agency hasn't made a decision on a formal investigation into what occurred on a plane ferrying Pitt, his wife Angelina Jolie Pitt and their six children.

Several news outlets have reported that a child welfare agency in Los Angeles is investigating the well-being of the children, who range in ages from 8 to 15.

Sources familiar with the allegations, but not authorized to speak publicly, say the child welfare investigation centers on Pitt's conduct toward his son Maddox, 15, during an argument on the Sept. 14 flight. No law enforcement agency responded to the plane when it landed in Minnesota after the incident.

Amara Suarez, a spokeswoman for the Los Angeles County Department of Children and Family Services, said the agency could not confirm whether it was investigating Pitt or the well-being of the former couple's children.

Calls to the offices of Pitt's attorney, Lance Spiegel, and Jolie Pitt's lawyer, Laura Wasser, were forwarded to recorded messages stating their firms do not comment on clients.

Jolie Pitt filed for divorce Monday and her lawyer released a statement the following day saying she came to the decision "for the health of the family." She listed their separation date as Sept. 15, the day after the alleged plane incident, and the actress is seeking sole custody of all six of the children.

Koochiching County, Minnesota, Sheriff Perryn Hedlund told The Associated Press on Thursday that Brad Pitt was on a plane that landed at the International Falls, Minnesota, airport near the Canadian border on Sept. 14.

Hedlund said his sheriff's deputies were not called to the airport, and International Falls police were also not called.

"There's no incident whatsoever reported to law enforcement," Hedlund said.

He said he didn't know why the plane landed in International Falls, but said it's not uncommon for hockey players or other celebrities to stop at the airport.

Pitt and Jolie Pitt — known as "Brangelina" — were together for 12 years but only wed in August 2014. They married privately at their French chateau in the Provence hamlet of Correns with their children serving as ring bearers and throwing flower petals. They announced the ceremony days later.

Their six children include 15-year-old Maddox, 12-year-old Pax, 11-year-old Zahara, 10-year-old Shiloh, and 8-year-old twins Knox and Vivienne.

This is the second marriage for Pitt, 52, who previously wed Jennifer Aniston. It's the third for Jolie Pitt, 41, who was previously married to Billy Bob Thornton and Jonny Lee Miller.

___

Associated Press Writer Amy Forliti in Minneapolis contributed to this report.

___

Anthony McCartney can be reached at http://twitter.com/mccartneyAP

Beyonce tour programmer Kwiz brilliantly explores blackness

It seems odd to describe the discussion of the black experience in America a "hot topic" — after all, the examination of the African-American experience has been explored for hundreds of years in some fashion, even before black people were considered Americans and were just considered property.

But with all the focus on the Black Lives Matter movement, the killings of black men at the hands of police, political rhetoric and the waning days of the country's first black president, it has been in the forefront more so now than perhaps a decade ago.

That's not only clear from the headlines, but in music. Performers have been channeling their emotions in songs, from Jay Z to T.I. to Kendrick Lamar to Beyoncé. And now, one of Beyonce's disciples — Kevin "Kwiz" Ryan, an audio programmer on Beyonce's "Formation World Tour" — takes things to the next level with his new album, "The Black Light Chronicles."

The producer, engineer and composer's exceptional political album tackles race, gun-control, colorism and more in an epic set of 14 songs through rap, rock, R&B and spoken word. It's a feature-heavy concept album, with artists you might have never heard of shining brightly, and speaking boldly.

On the opening track, "Back of the Bus," singer Toy !!! delivers raw lyrics over a smooth, beat-heavy track that is both irresistible and searing.

"Top of the class, you know I can pass with flying colors, and be the last in line for my chance to shine, oh is it a crime," she sings, referring to racial disparities black Americans still face today.

Other lyrics are even more blunt: On "Venom," Nyasha Nicole sounds striking, reciting lyrics such as: "It's 2016, feels like '65, nowhere to run, nowhere to hide."

The rap duo Flight School Alumni name drops Trayvon Martin, Sean Bell, Eric Garner, Sandra Bland, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., Malcolm X and Rosa Parks on "Tired"; and on "Butta Black Girls," Andria Nacine Cole speaks about the complexity of skin complexion within the black community.

It's a brilliant, call-to-action album that perfectly captures what's going on today, through a gloomy prism.

Video shows model Gigi Hadid elbowing reported prankster in face

Gigi Hadid is not the model to mess with.

The Huffington Post reported that Hadid was leaving a Milan Fashion Week show with her sister, Bella Hadid, in Milan, Italy, when the incident happened.

>> Read more trending stories

TMZ video, which contains explicit language, shows a man approach Hadid from behind, as she is flanked by security on both sides, and lift her in the air while she pauses to pose for photos with fans.

"Let go of me,” Hadid said. "Who the (expletive) are you? You piece of (expletive)."

Hadid can be seen on the video elbowing the man in the face before he walks away. Bella Hadid attempted to remove the man's hands from around Gigi Hadid's body.

The Hollywood Reporter reported that Ukrainian media personality Vitalii Sediuk is the man responsible for the incident. He is known for pranking celebrities at public events or spaces, most notably attempting to tackle Brad Pitt at a movie premiere in 2014 and trying to kiss Will Smith on a red carpet in 2012, for which Smith slapped him.

"While I consider Gigi Hadid beautiful, she and her friend Kendall Jenner have nothing to do with high fashion. By doing this, I encourage the fashion industry to put true talents on the runway and Vogue covers instead of well-connected cute girls from Instagram," Sediuk said in a statement to THR. "You can call it a manifest or a protest. This is also a wake-up call for Anna Wintour, who turned Vogue into a tabloid by putting Kardashians and other similar celebrities on a cover of a well-respected magazine," he said.

Whatever the reason for the prank, Sediuk's antics have been criticized and some have called it assault, which he considers to be "over-dramatic."

Hadid said on Twitter she was well within her rights to defend herself. The tweets were in response to an article that had a since-changed headline claiming she had not been exhibiting "model behavior." 

Daphne Oz's cookbook aims for weekend cooking on weekdays

Weekday cooking is fast, frazzled and too often defrosted. Weekend cooking, at its best, is relaxed, fresh and tempting.

Daphne Oz seeks to close the gap in her new book, "The Happy Cook," with 125 recipes that she says are practical enough for Monday through Friday while still tasty and adaptable enough to satisfy a variety of eaters and food concerns.

For TV's "The Chew" co-host, cooking at its best is an act of love and personal fulfillment, something she learned from her mother and grandmother.

She marvels at their "ability to be happy cooks, to have fun in the kitchen, to see it as release and freedom and as a place that was about them having confidence, and being a little bit wild and crazy," said Oz, daughter of doctor-TV personality Mehmet Oz ("The Dr. Oz Show").

Her cookbook has recipes including 10-minute breakfast tacos; balsamic onion and pear grilled cheese sandwiches; sweet corn ravioli; cider-braised brisket; honey-lime chicken wings and — wait for it — chocolate dulce de leche layer cake.

Most call for a reasonable number of ingredients. Others require a fair amount of food prep but also rely on bottled or home-made condiments kept on hand. The photos, whether of nicely plated dishes or idyllic shots of Oz at home with her family, are definitely aspirational.

In an interview, Oz discussed the logistics of making enticing, healthy food while juggling home and work demands, and why she believes counting calories isn't the way to go.

Associated Press: How can parents manage weekday cooking, which might include catering to child and adult tastes, without running screaming from the kitchen?

Oz: Don't make a different meal for every person, but make buildable meals. And, I do this with my kids, try to expand their palates gently. I'll make a basic lentil soup, which is still pretty advanced, with garlic and sweet potatoes and spices. And then make a spicy chili cumin oil for my husband and me to drizzle on top. It feels like an adult meal and a child's meal and doesn't cost me anything extra (in time).

AP: With fresh ingredients, especially veggies, there is potentially daunting chopping involved.

Oz: Having been to culinary school, the single greatest asset I learned there was how to cut and chop properly. It's an investment of money that will save you hours of time down the road, and hopefully some cut fingers. ... I would say even if you start small, start with one element of the meal that you make from scratch that night, and it will make a big difference nutritionally. Even more than that, I think it sets the tone for your family coming together and having a meal together.

AP: Are you concerned the cookbook might be pigeon-holed as suited to those with time and money to spare and easy access to fresh food?

Oz: I looked at all the things I was making on a regular basis and a lot of times I simplified. ... I tried to pay close attention to the reality that no one wants to go out and shop 20 ingredients for every meal they're gonna make. And let's not focus on specialty ingredients, but those homemade flavor-boosters you keep on hand that don't cost you much but that will really elevate your meals. I've tried to strive to make it not something just for the affluent, or people who have a grocery store around the block everywhere they go.

AP: The recipes don't include calorie counts or other nutritional information. Was that a deliberate choice?

Oz: It was. (As a college student trying to lose weight) I tried every diet under the sun and none of them worked but, more importantly, they were robbing me of my love of food. ... Once I got to a healthy place where I could know what would make me feel great and let me indulge when I needed to, I never wanted to go back to a place where I was exclusively thinking about a numbers game. ... My goal with these recipes is that you don't have to think about the numbers because the quality of it and the quantity I'm advising you to eat is something that can easily be part of a healthy and balanced lifestyle.

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Lynn Elber can be reached at lelber@ap.org and on Twitter at http://twitter.com/lynnelber.

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