Now Playing
Mix 965 Tulsa
Last Song Played
Today's Best Music!
On Air
No Program
Now Playing
Mix 965 Tulsa
Last Song Played
Today's Best Music!

movies

200 items
Results 1 - 10 of 200 next >

Oscar winning 'Moonlight' shines on Miami's Liberty City

Oscar winning film "Moonlight" presents a view of Miami that never shows up in a tourism video. Far from the sun and glamour of South Beach or the artists and hipsters of Wynwood, it shows predominantly black communities, truly known by few outside the people who live there.

And it's recognizably their Miami, made beautiful and suddenly more hopeful than it might have seemed before.

"The best thing about this movie is they actually went into the projects and shot it, and they let kids from around Liberty City be in it," said Kamal Ani-Bello, a freshman at Miami Northwestern Senior High School who had a role as an extra in the film. "Usually people make 'hoods on movie sets, but this actually shows the real thing — and that's why it won best picture."

"Moonlight" won the Academy Award Sunday night for best picture, best supporting actor and best adapted screenplay. It was nominated in five additional categories. It follows the life of a young black man as he grows up in a poverty-stricken neighborhood while coming to terms with his own homosexuality.

Director Barry Jenkins "came from the same grounds I came from, from the same city," said Larry Anderson, a Miami Northwestern junior who also had a role as an extra. Jenkins graduated from the same high school and had roots in a public housing project nicknamed "Pork & Beans" familiar to many students.

"Knowing that he came from the same — not just Miami, but Liberty City, same Pork & Beans, Miami Northwestern and the same programs that I've been part of, it tells me I can achieve in the same way as him," Anderson said.

Jenkins' wrote the screenplay for "Moonlight" with Tarell Alvin McCraney, who wrote the play on which the film is based. McCraney grew up in the same neighborhoods as Jenkins and attended the New World School of the Arts.

"This goes out to all those black and brown boys and girls and non-gender-conforming who don't see themselves," McCraney said during the ceremony.

Natalie Baldie, artistic director of the Performing and Visual Arts Center at Miami Northwestern, said she hopes the movie and its awards give students another perspective about getting out of Liberty City or going to college.

"It's giving them hope to get through and something to look forward to," Baldie said, sitting with Ani-Bello, Anderson and senior Amanda Ali, who also was an extra in the film. "We're used to seeing something about violence or rap music or athletes going to the NFL and things of that nature."

The film's theme of self-acceptance is one students and the community overall particularly need to hear, she added.

Ali said she hadn't been entirely aware of how "grown-up" the movie would be, "but that's good because it shows the truth."

The success of "Moonlight" also resonated Monday at Norland Middle School in Miami Gardens, where part of the film is set. Two young actors featured prominently in the film, Alex Hibbert and Jaden Piner, are Norland students, and about a dozen others were extras in the film.

Parents called and emailed Principal Ronald Redmon throughout the day to express pride in a program showing the talent coming Miami, he said.

"Today everyone beamed with pride. Parents were dropping off their kids with their horns blowing," Redmon said.

Graham Winick, the city of Miami Beach's film coordinator and a past president of Film Florida, called the success of "Moonlight" a cultural high-water mark for Miami and Florida, comparable to hosting an international art fair like Art Basel Miami Beach or preserving the area's signature Art Deco architecture. He pointed out that the film was made for just a fraction of the marketing budget for some of the films it was up against.

"That movie was $1.5 million in the can, and it looked amazing," Winick said. "It didn't have movie stars, but it still hit a nerve and got a release. People believed in it."

___

Associated Press writer David Fischer in Miami contributed to this report.

Oscars 'In Memoriam' tribute mistakenly uses photo of living producer

An Australian movie producer was accidentally featured in the "In Memoriam" segment at Sunday night’s Oscars despite the fact that she is “alive and well.”

According to People, an image of Jan Chapman was used to remember Janet Patterson, an Australian costume designer who died in October 2016.

>> 'Moonlight' wins Best Picture after 'La La Land' mistakenly announced

“I was devastated by the use of my image in place of my great friend and long-time collaborator Janet Patterson,” Chapman told Variety. “I had urged her agency to check any photograph which might be used and understand that they were told that the Academy had it covered.”

>> Steve Harvey reacts to epic Oscars gaffe

This came up in the In Memoriam section at #Oscars2017. But isn't this (living) Australian film producer Jan Chapman? pic.twitter.com/YKIMGBUv5E— David Berthold (@DavidBerthold) February 27, 2017

Chapman, who reportedly worked with Patterson on “The Piano” and “The Last Days of Chez Nous,” was “very disappointed” that the mistake wasn’t realized ahead of the ceremony.

>> Read more trending stories

“I am alive and well and an active producer,” she said.

Jimmy Kimmel shares insights on best picture Oscar gaffe

Oscars host Jimmy Kimmel shared his perspective on the show's best-picture gaffe during his Monday monologue on "Jimmy Kimmel Live !"

"As I'm sure you've at least heard, 'La La Land' was simultaneously somehow the biggest winner and loser last night," Kimmel said.

Presenters announced "La La Land" as the best picture winner at Sunday's Academy Awards, though "Moonlight" was the actual winner. Warren Beatty and Faye Dunaway had been given the best actress envelope to open instead of best picture. The accounting firm responsible for the integrity of the awards has taken responsibility for the error and apologized to all involved.

"It was the weirdest TV finale since 'Lost,'" Kimmel cracked.

He said the plan had been for him to end the Oscar show in the audience, seated next to Matt Damon, when rumblings began that there'd been a mistake.

"We're sitting there and we notice some commotion going on," Kimmel said. "And Matt says, 'I think I heard the stage manager say they got the winner wrong.' ...So you just kind of figure, well, the host will go onstage and clear this up. And then I remember, oh I'm the host."

Three "La La Land" producers gave acceptance speeches before the error was corrected and "Moonlight" received the award.

Kimmel said it was "mass confusion" when he got onstage and no one seemed sure what to do. Then Denzel Washington, sitting in the front row, got Kimmel's attention and shouted, "Barry!"

"Eventually I figured out that Barry Jenkins, the director of 'Moonlight,' is standing behind me and Denzel wanted me to get him to the microphone to make a speech, which makes sense," Kimmel said. "Thank God Denzel was there to make sense."

After ending the show, Kimmel spoke to Beatty backstage, who showed him the envelopes. Dunaway, "made quite a getaway," Kimmel said, leaving immediately after the show.

"Have any of you here ever hosted the Oscars before?" Kimmel joked with his Monday night audience. "Well, except for the end - it was a lot of fun."

___

Follow AP Entertainment Writer Sandy Cohen at www.twitter.com/APSandy .

The Latest: Accounting firm takes blame for Oscars flub

The Latest on the fallout from the mistaken announcement of the best picture winner at Sunday's Academy Awards (all times local):

6:40 p.m.

The accounting firm responsible for correctly tallying Academy Award winners says its team didn't move quickly enough to correct the incorrect announcement of the best picture winner at Sunday's Oscars.

PwC, formerly Price Waterhouse Coopers, says in a statement released Monday night that it accepts full responsibility for "the series of mistakes and breaches of established protocols."

The firm says partner Brian Cullinan mistakenly handed an envelope with the best actress winner to Warren Beatty and Faye Dunaway, who were presenting the best picture honor. PwC says Cullinan and another partner responsible for the integrity of the winners did not correct the mistake quickly enough.

The statement apologizes to the cast of "La La Land," which was mistakenly announced as the winner before the correct winner, "Moonlight," was announced.

___

4:50 p.m.

Moments before he handed out the wrong envelope in one of the worst gaffes in Oscar history, PwC accountant Brian Cullinan tweeted a behind-the-scenes photo of winner Emma Stone holding her statuette. "Best Actress Emma Stone backstage!" the tweet read.

It's one potential clue in the whodunit that Sunday's ceremony became after presenters Faye Dunaway and Warren Beatty mistakenly proclaimed "La La Land" as the best-picture winner instead of "Moonlight."

Cullinan was one of two accountants for PwC, formerly Price Waterhouse Coopers, tasked with doling out the envelopes containing winners' names to the presenters. But the envelope that Cullinan gave to Dunaway and Beatty was a duplicate of the previously announced win for Stone, not for best picture.

PwC declined comment Monday about Cullinan's social-media use may have distracted him.

Miami's Liberty City neighborhood shares 'Moonlight' success

Far from the sun and glamour of South Beach or the artists and hipsters of Wynwood, "Moonlight" presents a view of Miami that never shows up in a tourism video. It shows predominantly black communities, truly known by few outside the people who live there.

And it's recognizably their Miami, made beautiful and suddenly more hopeful than it might have seemed before.

"The best thing about this movie is they actually went into the projects and shot it, and they let kids from around Liberty City be in it," said Kamal Ani-Bello, a freshman at Miami Northwestern Senior High School who had a role as an extra in the film. "Usually people make 'hoods on movie sets, but this actually shows the real thing — and that's why it won best picture."

"Moonlight" won the Academy Award Sunday night for best picture, best supporting actor and best adapted screenplay. It was nominated in five additional categories. It follows the life of a young black man as he grows up in a poverty-stricken neighborhood while coming to terms with his own homosexuality.

Director Barry Jenkins "came from the same grounds I came from, from the same city," said Larry Anderson, a Miami Northwestern junior who also had a role as an extra. Jenkins graduated from the same high school and had roots in a public housing project nicknamed "Pork & Beans" familiar to many students.

"Knowing that he came from the same — not just Miami, but Liberty City, same Pork & Beans, Miami Northwestern and the same programs that I've been part of, it tells me I can achieve in the same way as him," Anderson said.

Jenkins' wrote the screenplay for "Moonlight" with Tarell Alvin McCraney, who wrote the play on which the film is based. McCraney grew up in the same neighborhoods as Jenkins and attended the New World School of the Arts.

"This goes out to all those black and brown boys and girls and non-gender-conforming who don't see themselves," McCraney said during the ceremony.

Natalie Baldie, artistic director of the Performing and Visual Arts Center at Miami Northwestern, said she hopes the movie and its awards give students another perspective about getting out of Liberty City or going to college.

"It's giving them hope to get through and something to look forward to," Baldie said, sitting with Ani-Bello, Anderson and senior Amanda Ali, who also was an extra in the film. "We're used to seeing something about violence or rap music or athletes going to the NFL and things of that nature."

The film's theme of self-acceptance is one students and the community overall particularly need to hear, she added.

Ali said she hadn't been entirely aware of how "grown-up" the movie would be, "but that's good because it shows the truth."

The success of "Moonlight" also resonated Monday at Norland Middle School in Miami Gardens, where part of the film is set. Two young actors featured prominently in the film, Alex Hibbert and Jaden Piner, are Norland students, and about a dozen others were extras in the film.

Parents called and emailed Principal Ronald Redmon throughout the day to express pride in a program showing the talent coming Miami, he said.

"Today everyone beamed with pride. Parents were dropping off their kids with their horns blowing," Redmon said.

Graham Winick, the city of Miami Beach's film coordinator and a past president of Film Florida, called the success of "Moonlight" a cultural high-water mark for Miami and Florida, comparable to hosting an international art fair like Art Basel Miami Beach or preserving the area's signature Art Deco architecture. He pointed out that the film was made for just a fraction of the marketing budget for some of the films it was up against.

"That movie was $1.5 million in the can, and it looked amazing," Winick said. "It didn't have movie stars, but it still hit a nerve and got a release. People believed in it."

___

David Fischer in Miami contributed to this report.

Firm says several mistakes caused Oscars best picture gaffe

The accounting firm responsible for the integrity of the Academy Awards said Monday that its staffers did not move quickly enough to correct the biggest error in Oscars history — the mistaken announcement of the best picture winner.

PwC, formerly Price Waterhouse Coopers, wrote in a statement that several mistakes were made and two of its partners assigned to the prestigious awards show did not act quickly enough when "La La Land" was mistakenly announced as the best picture winner. Three of the film's producers spoke before the actual winner, the coming-of-age drama "Moonlight," was announced.

"PwC takes full responsibility for the series of mistakes and breaches of established protocols during last night's Oscars," PwC wrote. It said its partner, Brian Cullinan, mistakenly handed presenters Warren Beatty and Faye Dunaway an envelope containing the winner of the best actress award.

"Once the error occurred, protocols for correcting it were not followed through quickly enough by Mr. Cullinan or his partner," the statement read.

It did not address in detail which protocols were violated, or say whether a tweet Cullinan sent about best actress winner Emma Stone before the best picture announcement contributed to the mistake.

The firm, which has handled Oscar winner announcements for eight decades, apologized to Beatty, Dunaway, the cast and crew of "La La Land" and "Moonlight," the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, and host Jimmy Kimmel.

"We wish to extend our deepest gratitude to each of them for the graciousness they displayed during such a difficult moment," the statement said. "For the past 83 years, the academy has entrusted PwC with the integrity of the awards process during the ceremony, and last night we failed the academy."

The statement came after nearly a day of speculation about how the worst gaffe in Oscars history unfolded. The fiasco launched countless punchlines, memes and a probe of what went wrong.

The mystery deepened Monday afternoon after the Wall Street Journal reported that Cullinan tweeted a behind-the-scenes photo of winner Emma Stone holding her statuette. "Best Actress Emma Stone backstage!" the tweet read. The tweet, sent moments before the best picture announcement, raised the question of whether the accountant was distracted from the task at hand. Although the tweet was deleted from the social media site, a copy of it was kept by Google and available through a cache page.

The mistaken announcement altered the usual celebration that follows the coronation of a best picture winner. The only Oscars mistake that came close occurred in 1964, when Sammy Davis was given the wrong envelope for best music score winner but made a quick correction.

The "La La Land"-''Moonlight" mix-up, in contrast, took a painfully long time to be announced, with two-plus minutes elapsing before it was announced to the moviemakers and the world at large.

The embarrassing episode stepped squarely on what should have been a night of high-fiving for the academy. After last year's awards were clouded by the #OscarsSoWhite protests, diversity ruled Sunday as actors Viola Davis ("Fences") and Mahershala Ali ("Moonlight") were among the people of color claiming trophies, while "Moonlight" focused on African-American characters.

PwC, which originated in London over a century ago, was quick to apologize to the movies involved. The academy has not yet commented on the mistake.

On paper, the process for announcing Oscars winners seems straight-forward. As per protocol, Cullinan and PwC colleague Martha Ruiz toted briefcases to the awards via the red carpet, each holding an identical set of envelopes for the show's 24 categories. The accountants also memorize the winners.

During the telecast, the accountants were stationed in the Dolby Theatre wings, one stage left and one stage right, to give presenters their category's envelope before they went on stage. Most presenters entered stage right, where Cullinan was posted and where he handed Beatty and Dunaway the errant envelope.

Yet the previous award, best actress, had been presented by Leonardo DiCaprio, who entered stage left and received the envelope from Ruiz. That left a duplicate, unopened envelope for best actress at stage right.

"It's a simple process, if a painstaking one," said Dan Lyle, who had Oscar duties for Price Waterhouse for 11 years in the 1980s and '90s. Accountants attended rehearsals to learn whether presenters would enter from the right or left. But given the possibility of last-minute changes, both accountants had a full set of envelopes.

When Lyle ended up with a redundant envelope for a category handled by his colleague, he said, he got it out of the way by stuffing it in a pocket or otherwise discarding it before moving on to the next award.

Lyle said there were always nerves no matter how much care was taken. Each time an envelope was dispensed, he said, he hoped that "I handed over the right one." If the wrong winner was announced, a PwC accountant was to quickly dash to the stage to correct the error.

Such a rapid response should have occurred Sunday but didn't, as confusion reigned onstage. Backstage, however, people were working calmly to right the ship, said Matt Sayles, a freelance photographer for The Associated Press.

"It was more crazy onstage. I feel like backstage knew that something was wrong and they handled it," Sayles said. "They clearly knew that something was wrong."

Sayles, who has shot five Academy Awards from a backstage position just out of the sight of television cameras, said the result of the mix-up was a more subdued celebration from winners including "Moonlight" director Barry Jenkins.

One observer said London-based PwC is scrambling now. Nigel Currie, an independent branding specialist in London with decades' worth of industry experience, said this mistake is "as bad a mess-up as you could imagine."

"They had a pretty simple job to do and messed it up spectacularly," he said. "They will be in deep crisis talks on how to deal with it."

___

AP writers Lynn Elber in Los Angeles and Pan Pylas in London, and AP Social Media Editor Eric Carvin in New York contributed to this report.

Here's what happened onstage during the Oscars' mistake

or maybe farce — directors would surely reject it. But let's set the scene anyway for the Academy Awards drama over what film did, and didn't, win the Oscar for best picture on Sunday night.

We pan in on the stage of the Dolby Theatre in Los Angeles, where actors Warren Beatty and Faye Dunaway are about to announce best picture, the culmination of entertainment's biggest awards show. Beatty opens a red envelope and looks at the card inside, giving a double-take. He looks inside the envelope to see if there's anything else there.

BEATTY: "The Academy Award..."

He pauses, looks at the envelope again.

BEATTY: "For best picture..."

He pauses again and looks offstage, then hands the envelope to Dunaway, who gives it a quick glance.

DUNAWAY: "La La Land."

The audience applauds, as the cast, crew and producers of "La La Land" take the stage to accept what many had anticipated, the coveted honor of best picture. Producers Jordan Horowitz and Marc Platt give speeches, but something seems amiss as Platt speaks. There's commotion among the people standing behind him as a man wearing headphones appears and checks red envelopes being held by producers.

PLATT: "Keep dreaming, because the dreams we dream today will provide the love, compassion and the humanity that will narrate the story of our lives tomorrow."

The third producer, Fred Berger, takes his turn at the microphone and speaks briefly before looking at a confused scene behind him.

BERGER: "We lost, by the way."

HOROWITZ: "There's a mistake. 'Moonlight,' you guys won best picture. This is not a joke."

PLATT: "This is not a joke. I'm afraid they read the wrong thing."

HOROWITZ: "This is not a joke. 'Moonlight' has won best picture."

Horowitz takes a card from Beatty and holds it up. The camera pans in so the words are visible: "Moonlight" has indeed won best picture. Host Jimmy Kimmel approaches the microphone and alludes to Steve Harvey, whose 2015 reading of the wrong Miss Universe winner instantly becomes the second most-embarrassing awards show flub.

KIMMEL: "Guys. This is very unfortunate what happened. Personally, I blame Steve Harvey for this."

Kimmel looks at Horowitz.

KIMMEL: "I would like to see you get an Oscar anyway. Why can't we just give out a whole bunch of them?"

HOROWITZ: "I'm going to be really proud to hand this to my friends at 'Moonlight.'"

KIMMEL: "That's nice of you."

Beatty approaches the microphone.

BEATTY: "Hello? Hello?"

KIMMEL: "Warren, what did you do?"

BEATTY: "I want to tell you what happened. I opened the envelope and it said 'Emma Stone, La La Land.' That's why I took such a long look at Faye and you. I wasn't trying to be funny."

By now, the cast and crew of "Moonlight" is taking the stage, supplanting the folks from "La La Land," who were slipping away. The camera switches to people in the audience who look dumbfounded. Matt Damon whistles. Barry Jenkins, creator of "Moonlight," approaches the microphone.

JENKINS: "Very clearly in my dreams, this could not be true. But to hell with dreams, I'm done with it, because this is true. Oh, my goodness."

Jenkins finishes his speech. Then Kimmel takes the microphone again.

KIMMEL: "Well, I don't know what happened. I blame myself. ... It's just an awards show ... I knew I would screw this show up. I really did ... I promise I'll never come back."

___

This story has been corrected to show that Jordan Horowitz is one of the producers of "La La Land."

Box Office Top 20: 'Get Out' nets $33.4 million opening

Comedian Jordan Peele's directorial debut, "Get Out," did even better in its first weekend in theaters than initially projected. The micro budget thriller pulled in $33.4 million — about $3 million higher than what was estimated on Sunday by the studios.

It easily topped the box office and unseated "The Lego Batman Movie" from first place. The "Lego Movie" spinoff earned $19.2 million in its third week in theaters.

Lionsgate's "John Wick: Chapter Two" took the third-place spot with $9.4 million, bringing its total to $74.8 million after three weeks, while "The Great Wall" added $9.1 million in week two. In fifth place, "Fifty Shades Darker" grossed $7.8 million, bumping the picture past the $100 million mark domestically.

The top 20 movies at U.S. and Canadian theaters Friday through Sunday, followed by distribution studio, gross, number of theater locations, average receipts per location, total gross and number of weeks in release, as compiled Monday by comScore:

1. "Get Out," Universal, $33,377,060, 2,781 locations, $12,002 average, $33,377,060, 1 week.

2. "The Lego Batman Movie," Warner Bros., $19,208,097, 4,057 locations, $4,735 average, $133,214,675, 3 weeks.

3. "John Wick: Chapter Two," Lionsgate, $9,358,982, 2,954 locations, $3,168 average, $74,771,682, 3 weeks.

4. "The Great Wall," Universal, $9,125,960, 3,328 locations, $2,742 average, $34,831,600, 2 weeks.

5. "Fifty Shades Darker," Universal, $7,792,655, 3,216 locations, $2,423 average, $103,727,870, 3 weeks.

6. "Fist Fight," Warner Bros., $6,571,348, 3,185 locations, $2,063 average, $23,446,175, 2 weeks.

7. "Hidden Figures," 20th Century Fox, $5,805,737, 2,022 locations, $2,871 average, $152,746,541, 10 weeks.

8. "La La Land," Lionsgate, $4,689,292, 1,733 locations, $2,706 average, $140,949,357, 12 weeks.

9. "Split," Universal, $4,098,990, 1,901 locations, $2,156 average, $130,823,885, 6 weeks.

10. "Lion," The Weinstein Company, $3,832,257, 1,802 locations, $2,127 average, $42,840,594, 14 weeks.

11. "Rock Dog," Lionsgate, $3,704,749, 2,077 locations, $1,784 average, $3,704,749, 1 week.

12. "A Dog's Purpose," Universal, $3,572,435, 2,089 locations, $1,710 average, $57,581,040, 5 weeks.

13. "MET Opera: Rusalka (2017)," Fathom Events, $1,540,000, 900 locations, $1,711 average, $1,540,000, 1 week.

14. "Collide," Open Road, $1,512,824, 2,045 locations, $740 average, $1,512,824, 1 week.

15. "Cure For Wellness, A," 20th Century Fox, $1,401,394, 2,704 locations, $518 average, $7,496,644, 2 weeks.

16. "Moana," Disney, $827,436, 378 locations, $2,189 average, $246,027,358, 14 weeks.

17. "I Am Not Your Negro," Magnolia Pictures, $826,126, 313 locations, $2,639 average, $4,681,486, 4 weeks.

18. "Fences," Paramount, $776,093, 597 locations, $1,300 average, $56,552,381, 11 weeks.

19. "Rings," Paramount, $686,936, 719 locations, $955 average, $27,296,410, 4 weeks.

20. "Moonlight," A24, $591,202, 585 locations, $1,011 average, $22,111,526, 19 weeks.

---

Universal and Focus are owned by NBC Universal, a unit of Comcast Corp.; Sony, Columbia, Sony Screen Gems and Sony Pictures Classics are units of Sony Corp.; Paramount is owned by Viacom Inc.; Disney, Pixar and Marvel are owned by The Walt Disney Co.; Miramax is owned by Filmyard Holdings LLC; 20th Century Fox and Fox Searchlight are owned by 21st Century Fox; Warner Bros. and New Line are units of Time Warner Inc.; MGM is owned by a group of former creditors including Highland Capital, Anchorage Advisors and Carl Icahn; Lionsgate is owned by Lions Gate Entertainment Corp.; IFC is owned by AMC Networks Inc.; Rogue is owned by Relativity Media LLC.

Oscars flap eclipses 'Moonlight' win, but civility reigns

The 89th Academy Awards got off on the right foot, with a song and dance, but ended with the most stunning mistake ever to befall the esteemed awards show when the best picture Oscar was presented to the wrong movie. Faye Dunaway and Warren Beatty, holding an incorrect envelope, wrongly presented the top prize to "La La Land" instead of "Moonlight."

The moment at the conclusion of the Sunday-night show was so jaw-dropping, it eclipsed everything else in a ceremony that was packed to the brim with Donald Trump jabs, fun stunts, heartfelt positivity and a stunning upset by "Moonlight" over what had been a "La La" juggernaut throughout the awards season. Yet somehow, even the embarrassing moment pivoted into grace.

As confusion and bafflement overwhelmed those in the Dolby Theatre and at home on their couches, "Moonlight" director Barry Jenkins and "La La Land" director Damien Chazelle shared a hug on the back of the stage, out of sight from the television cameras.

"The folks of 'La La Land' were so gracious. I can't imagine being in their position and having to do that," Jenkins told reporters backstage. "It was unfortunate that things happened as they did but, goddamn, we won best picture."

Oscar tabulators PwC, in their 83rd year providing the service to the academy, later apologized in a statement and are investigating why it happened.

There's no denying, though, that "Moonlight's" win over "La La Land" was a massive upset, made only more pointed by the envelope gaffe. Chazelle's candy-colored musical was widely presumed to be a shoo-in for the top prize after its record-tying 14 nominations and a relative sweep of the awards season. The film still won six Oscars, including best director for Chazelle, who at 32 became the youngest ever to take the prize, and for score, song ("City of Stars") and actress to Emma Stone.

The actress, who pledged her deep love of "Moonlight," said later, "Is that the craziest Oscar moment of all time? Cool!"

The best picture mix-up apparently wasn't the only gaffe at the Oscars. An Australian film producer's photo was mistakenly included in the "In Memoriam" tribute. Jan Chapman's photo was shown with the name of Janet Patterson, an Australian costume designer who died in 2015. The Academy didn't respond to a request for comment.

The academy usually throws awards at films that gaze lovingly at Hollywood, but Barry Jenkins' heartfelt coming-of-age drama seduced academy voters in the end — a subtle tide change perhaps informed by both a prickly political climate and an urgent imperative to honor more diverse films after two consecutive years of OscarsSoWhite.

Diversity could be found in every corner of the awards this year, with supporting acting wins for "Moonlight's" Mahershala Ali and "Fences'" Viola Davis, although the best actor category proved to be a bit of an upset when Casey Affleck won for "Manchester by the Sea" over Denzel Washington of "Fences," who had picked up momentum in recent weeks.

The improvement followed efforts by Academy of Motion Pictures Arts and Sciences President Cheryl Boone Isaacs to diversify the membership of the largely white, older and male film academy. "Tonight is proof that art has no borders, no single language and does not belong to a single faith," said Isaacs.

Davis gave a particularly powerful speech in which she praised the late "Fences" playwright August Wilson who, she said, "Exhumed and exalted the ordinary people." Kimmel said later that Davis, "Just got nominated for an Emmy for that speech."

Ezra Edelman, whose nearly eight-hour epic "O.J.: Made in America" took best documentary, dedicated the award to the victims of the famous crime, Nicole Brown Simpson and Ronald Goldman.

Rich Moore, one of the three directors of Disney's best animated film winner "Zootopia," described the movie as about "tolerance being more powerful than fear of the other."

The majority of speeches were moving and personal and generally in praise of art's ability to create empathy in the world, including Jenkins' in his win for adapted screenplay, who said, "All you people out there who feel like there isn't a mirror out there for you, the Academy has your back, the ACLU has your back, and for the next four years we will not leave you alone, we will not forget you." But not one speech came close to Meryl Streep's Golden Globes barnburner.

"Personally, I didn't say anything because my head was completely blank," Affleck said backstage of his not political speech.

Instead, politics stayed largely with host Jimmy Kimmel, who kept his barbs coy and irreverent, stating at the start that he wasn't the man to unite the country.

The host peppered the evening with digs at President Trump, at one point asking the crowd to stand for the "overrated Meryl Streep," and, later, for any news outlet with the word "Times" in its name to leave, saying, "We have no tolerance for fake news."

Kimmel even jokingly thanked the president for shifting the focus of the night.

"Remember last year when it seemed like the Oscars were racist?" he said in the opening.

The evening's most blunt protests against Trump came not from the A-list stars but from foreigners, a few of whom were not even in attendance and could communicate their sentiments only through statements.

Kimmel, as if predicting that this would be the case, said early that the Oscars are watched by 225 countries "that now hate us."

Iranian director Asghar Farhadi, whose "The Salesman" won best foreign film, his second win in the category, did not attend the ceremony in protest of Trump's travel ban to seven predominantly Muslim nations.

Anousheh Ansari, an Iranian astronaut, read a statement from Farhadi.

"I'm sorry I'm not with you tonight," it read. "My absence is out of respect for the people of my country and those of other six nations who have been disrespected by the inhumane law that bans entry of immigrants to the U.S."

Gael Garcia Bernal, the Mexican actor, while presenting an award, also declared: "As a migrant worker, as a Mexican, and as a human being, I am against any wall."

But, of course, the big best picture mistake will be the thing that history remembers about the 89th Academy Awards.

"Let's remember this is just an awards show," Kimmel said at the close. "I knew I would screw this show up, I really did. I promise I'll never come back."

___

AP Film Writer Jake Coyle contributed from Los Angeles.

Trump says Oscars focused hard on politics before 'sad' end

President Donald Trump is giving Sunday's Academy Awards two thumbs down, calling the botched ending "sad."

The president said in an interview with Breitbart News on Monday that the Academy Awards "focused so hard on politics that they didn't get the act together at the end." Pointing to the flubbed awarding of "Moonlight" as the Oscar-winning best picture after initially giving the prize to "La La Land," Trump said, "to end that way was sad."

The president was attending a Governors' Ball at the White House for most of Sunday's awards ceremony. The annual Oscars ceremony carried a political edge throughout the evening, with many winners, presenters and host Jimmy Kimmel taking digs at Trump.

Trump, who was photographed at the Oscars in 2011, said the ceremony "didn't feel like a very glamorous evening." He said the event "was a little sad. It took away from the glamour of the Oscars."

The president has been critical of the Oscars before. In February 2015, he complained that the Oscars ceremony was "absolutely terrible" and "boring" and suggested the "perfect host for next year: Me."

At the end of Sunday's ceremony, presenters Warren Beatty and Faye Dunaway apparently took the wrong envelope onto the stage for best picture and mistakenly read "La La Land" as the winner. Kimmel came forward to inform the cast that "Moonlight" had won the prize.

The 32.9 million viewers tuning into Sunday's Academy Awards represented a drop-off of more than a million from last year and Oscar's smallest audience since 2008.

___

AP Television Writer Frazier Moore contributed to this report.

200 items
Results 1 - 10 of 200 next >