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MIX 96 FREE EYE EXAM FORM

Complete the following entry to apply for a free eye exam and free pair of glasses from the SPECS Program from Dr. Jeff Long's Children & Family Eye Care. You may submit for yourself, or someone else that truly needs this eye care gift.

The SPECS Program: Servants Providing Eye Care Services is a program dedicated to improving the lives of others around the world. The program is committed to creating an impact to communities locally and abroad.

The mission is simple...Free eye exams and glasses provided to those in need to allow as many people as possible the opportunity to enjoy the gift of sight.

Mix 96 and Dr. Long will award one free eye exam and pair of glasses (if necessary) each weekday for the duration of this program.

PLEASE NOTE: This is not a prize to be won. It is a charitable gift made possible through the SPECS Program from Dr. Jeff Long's Children and Family Eye Care. Please make sure that whomever you are nominating is truly in need.

GET A FREE EYE EXAM AND GLASSES FROM DR. JEFF LONG AND MIX 96.5

Poor or failing eye sight can have a significant and negative impact on an individual's ability to thrive in school and on the job. Even day-to-day self-care can be difficult without the ability to see clearly.

Mix 96.5 is teaming up with Dr. Jeff Long's Children & Family Eye Care and the SPECS program to serve our community and offer those in need a free eye exam and free pair of glasses.

The SPECS Program: Servants Providing Eye Care Services is a program dedicated to improving the lives of others around the world. The program is committed to creating an impact to communities locally and abroad. The mission is simple...Free eye exams and glasses provided to those in need to allow as many people as possible the opportunity to enjoy the gift of sight.

Complete the entry below to apply for a free eye exam and free pair of glasses from the SPECS program at Dr. Jeff Long's Children & Family Eye Care. You may submit for yourself, or someone else that you feel would benefit from this eye care gift.

Mix 96 and Dr. Long will give away one free eye exam and pair of glasses (if necessary) each weekday for the duration of this program.

Please click HERE to apply now.

Susan Brock

My mom has been called just about everything…A once in a lifetime kind of friend… A gift… An angel on earth... She was unique and vibrant. Mom always had an easy, simple way about her. To me, she was simply Mom, and she lived with my husband, Mark, and I for the last six years of her life while fighting stage IV breast cancer. This year, I will run the 13.1 mile Rock n Roll San Antonio Half-Marathon in memory of my mom, Sharon, who lost her life at age 63 on the evening of September 29, 2009. I am ready to run and to honor her tenacity and love for life with every training step and every race mile! She would be jumping up and down in encouragement on the sidelines of this race if she was alive today, and she would encourage you in the very same way!

My goal is to raise a dollar to fund finding the cure for breast cancer for every single day that my mom fought her second diagnosis - stage IV breast cancer. When I think about the pain and treatments that she endured with a smile on her face, I realize that the marathon training I am doing pales in comparison. Every day that she woke up since that fateful diagnosis on January 4, 2004 was a blessing. Every round of chemo, ICU stay, ventilator treatment, and doctor visit she emerged from with that smile still spread wide across her face, a miracle. Living with my mom taught me a lot about toughness, about choosing joy in the midst of pain, and about the strength and grandiosity of spirit that can be held in a thin, tiny frame. 

My mom would tell you to do the important things today, and not plan and wait for someday in the future. Because she knew all too well, that tomorrow does not always come and the next day is never promised to us. Thankfully, she made it long enough to witness the birth of my son, Ryan. 

Cancer accompanied my mother everywhere she went for the last 15 years of her life. The disease powerfully twisted everything we thought to be true about life and broke the mold of our expectations about how life should go. But the cancer also acted like a crucible, forcing authenticity to the top, clarifying what was important over what was urgent, and giving us all the chance to think and talk about the important things in life. 

My friends and family, as well as my mom’s friends have been so caring during her illness and since her death, and they’ve been extra supportive of this goal I’ve set out to accomplish. It feels so good to be able to do something positive to bring attention to this disease which attacked my family. I am ready to fight back and raise awareness about stage 4 breast cancer. The weekend of the race would be her 64th birthday, and I am excited and ready to reach my training and fundraising goals to honor her memory by completing this race. I can’t imagine a better way to spend such a special date!

Estelle Atney

I am a military "brat." I am a marathoner. I am also a breast cancer survivor.

I was diagnosed with breast cancer in October 2009. I was three quarters of the way through my goal of running either a marathon or half marathon every month in 2009 when I was hit with the dreaded news: "I think that’s cancer." I had found a lump on the side of my right breast back in June, but I waited a few months to have it checked by a doctor, thinking I had a cracked rib. Turns out I had both breast cancer and a cracked rib! After a whirlwind of two surgeries, tests and treatments, I finished my chemotherapy and radiation therapy in April 2010. 

My family didn’t have a history of breast cancer. I was fit, ate healthy, drank green tea daily, took Vitamin D - I did everything I was supposed to do to prevent breast cancer. My diagnosis made me realize that everyone is susceptible to the disease. It does not discriminate. It made me want to make people aware and to help find a cure. That’s when I found the Susan G. Komen Marathon for the Cure. 

Running the Marine Corps Marathon for Marathon for the Cure embodies the three things with which I identify the most and for which I am most proud: being a military brat, a marathoner, and a survivor. I will be able to honor my friends and all soldiers currently serving in the military, as well as my father, all of my friends’ fathers, and veterans. I will be doing one of the things I love, which is to run marathons. And by finishing the marathon, I will prove to myself that breast cancer can’t beat me - that I’m a survivor.

Katherine Kirklin

Whenever my family gets together, I find myself thinking about my mother's oncologist.

A handful of years and many good check-ups after my mom's fight with breast cancer. Some part of me still automatically thanks the doctors who saved her life and continue to give us the gift of being together. Because of the excellent care that my mom received and the fact that her cancer was detected early, we are still a family. My mom would have died at age 51 if early detection technology, advanced surgery, and chemotherapy had not been available to her. Instead, myfamily has been given years of love, friendship, and adventure together. 

My mom faced breast cancer with incredible bravery, humor, and heart. With my brother off at college, it was just the two of us at home, and there was a lot of laughter as we navigated a year of surgeries and treatment. Amazingly, my mom managed to cultivate something positive out of her illness: we became more inventive cooks as we took her doctor’s advice and incorporated more organic and natural foods into our diet; we spent time together watching old movies and took a vacation to the beach. When my mom was healthy again, she finally started traveling abroad something she’d talked and dreamed about since I was young. 

That is why I am running the Portland Half Marathon for the Komen Foundation and for my mom: I can’t imagine a better way to honor the spirit with which she fought breast cancer than to do something active, challenging, and fun. I am elated to support the research efforts that enabled my mom to fight breast cancer and will arm women around the world to do the same. I am equally excited to be running as part of the Komen Team in celebration of the power and strength of women fighting for their health, and changing their lives in the process.

Kenneth Rodgers

I'm not sure how to begin, so I'll just give a little background.

I've known Jessica since high school, and we dated a little in college. We lost touch for a few years while I was in the army but began dating again when I was discharged. We were engaged in August, 2003 and married in September, 2004. In August of 2008, our son, Jack, was born. About 5 years ago she was diagnosed with Lupus and it really altered her lifestyle. She could no longer run and exercise like she did in the past due to the muscle fatigue and joint pain Lupus caused. She also developed a sensitivity to the sun that would limit her time outdoors. Another side effect of the Lupus and the medicine used to treat it were seizures that she began to suffer from 4 years ago. After some medicine juggling and a six-month stint of not being able to drive, the seizures were brought under control. 

Jessica was considered to have fibro adenoma and has found lumps in the past. After breast sonograms and some biopsies, they were always found to be benign. This past March, she found a lump, and went for a sonogram that really didn't leave us worried after our past experience. It was a lump that had been discovered six-months prior during a sonogram and didn't seem significant. This time the lump had grown a bit and the radiologist recommended a biopsy. Still not worried after a consultation with her breast surgeon, she went in for the biopsy on March 10th. 

On Friday, March 12th when my phone rang at 7pm and I heard her surgeons voice on the other end of the phone, I knew it wasn't good news. The lump had turned out to be cancerous. The next few weeks of office visits and internet research where a blur, but on April 7th, Jessica went in for a double bilateral mastectomy. The surgery went well and there was still a chance of not having to go through chemo after finding out she was node negative and was also negative for the BRCA test. 

After a long and stressful 3-4 weeks of waiting, the results of the oncotype came back and it put her in the low risk portion of the test. Given the fact that she is only 32, was in the high-end of the low bracket of the oncotype test, and that there apparently was some cancer cells detected in a lymph node (though not enough to classify her as node positive), her oncologist recommended chemo. 

She started her chemotherapy treatment on May 28th and has 3 more treatments, every other week. It's been very difficult watch her fight through all of these things and not really be able to help. I try to be as supportive as possible, but there are only so many times you can ask "Is there anything I can get for you?" I joined Marathon for the Cure because I've heard nothing but great things about the Susan G. Komen organization, and I felt like I had to get myself in motion to help raise some money and hopefully help find a cure for this awful disease. 

While there have obviously been difficult days and times to say "Why me?" Jessica has remained amazingly positive and is charging into the fight head on. She is truly an amazing and inspiring woman!

2016 SUSAN G. KOMEN RACE FOR THE CURE

Susan G. Komen Race for the Cure® Series is the world’s largest and most successful education and fundraising event for breast cancer ever created. This year's race will be held on Saturday, September 24th.

 

The event raises significant funds and awareness for the breast cancer movement, celebrates breast cancer survivorship and honors those who have lost their battle with the disease. 

 

This Race is unique in the fact that 100% of the net proceeds are allocated to our mission. 75 percent of the net income stays in our community to help fund local programs offering breast health education and breast cancer screening and treatment. The remaining 25 percent of the net income supports the Susan G. Komen® Grants Program. 

Get signed up for the race now by clicking HERE.

Coach strips to underwear to protest Olympic wrestling match

It's common for emotions to run high during the final seconds of any Olympic event. Sometimes, outcomes are contested.

But one man undressed Sunday afternoon as he contested the final scoring of a wrestling match.

In the 65kg freestyle wrestling bronze medal match, Uzbekistan’s Ikhtiyor Navaruzov beat Mongolia’s Mandakhnaran Ganzorig 8-7 in a match that ended in controversy and two Mongolian coaches taking off their clothes at the Olympic venue.

In the final seconds of the match, Ganzorig led by one and began dancing to celebrate his imminent medal. That celebration didn't last long.

According to The Associated Press, Uzbekistan challenged the scoring. Officials awarded Navaruzov a penalty point, which also gave him the bronze medal because tie matches are decided by the wrestler who last scored a point. 

Then began the unlikely turn of events.

Two Mongolian coaches stormed the mat in protest and began angrily shedding their clothes, with one getting all the way down to his blue briefs while the crowd chanted "Mongolia! Mongolia!"

That led to match officials awarding yet another penalty point.

Police eventually escorted the coaches from the mat.

See video here.

Photos: Dragon Con 2015

What makes an Olympic swimming pool 'fast'?

The oldest Olympic swimming records are from the 2008 games in Beijing. Setting new record times has become a bit of a trend since then.

Yes, these are some of the most capable swimmers on the planet. But experts think the pools themselves might have something to do with it, too.

"It's by far the fastest pool in the world. And when I say fast, I'm talking about deep water," NBC's Rowdy Gaines told NPR in 2008.

>> Read more trending stories  

Since the Beijing games, all the Olympic pools have been 3 meters deep, the recommended Olympic depth set by swimming's world governing body.

By accident or by design, it's deep enough that the waves the swimmers generate don't rebound off the bottom, so the water at the surface stays calmer.

Lane lines, unoccupied buffer lanes on either side and special gutters along the edges of the pool all help reduce the effect waves and turbulence have on the swimmers.

And the benefit would seem to be in the numbers. During the Rio Olympics, swimmers set more than 10 new world or Olympic records.

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