Now Playing
Mix 965 Tulsa
Last Song Played
Today's Best Music!
On Air
No Program
Now Playing
Mix 965 Tulsa
Last Song Played
Today's Best Music!

health

200 items
Results 21 - 30 of 200 < previous next >

Photographer captures 6 families' fights with childhood cancer in heartbreaking project

The “More Than 4” photo project by Sherina Welch of Houston, Texas-based FreeSpiritFoto aims to educate the public on what cancer really looks like by documenting six families’ fights with childhood cancer, as well as spread awareness about the fact that only 4 percent of funds for cancer research go to children.

>> Learn more here

On Saturday, Welch posted an emotional photo series of Colt Wilson, a child cancer patient who underwent 43 weeks of chemotherapy and 28 days, with his mom and dad after his last chemo treatment.

“The first day we walked onto this floor comes flooding back to my mind, and all my fears of cancer killing my baby are fresh again,” Cortni Wilson, Colt’s mom, told Welch. “Treatment is finally over, but the worry isn’t.”

>> Read more trending news

Wilson explained that it was reassuring for Colt to be on the hospital every week getting checked out, but now that his treatment is over, it would be months before he gets checked out again.

“I knew the chemo could kill him, I knew he could have complications, I knew cancer could completely take over,” she said. “So now that it’s finally here, I feel like I’m gonna lose it. I’m scared beyond my mind, excited and relieved, nervous and overjoyed.”

>> See the photos here

Tick spreading in the US gives people meat allergies 

A bite from the aggressive Lone Star tick could do more than give you an irritable rash — it could potentially induce a dangerous meat allergy.

» RELATED: How to prevent, find and get rid of ticks this summer 

The tick, widely distributed in the southeastern and eastern United States, is spreading to even more areas, including Minnesota, New Hampshire and Long Island, New York, and is making people allergic to just a single bite of meat.

According to Wired.com, something in the tick bite makes people sensitive to the sugar compound alpha-galactose, or alpha-gal, found in meat from mammals.

» RELATED: What is Lyme disease and how to avoid it 

And unlike most allergies, which are dependent on a mix of genetic and environmental factors, alpha-gal allergies seem to affect anyone and everyone, regardless of genetic makeup, Wired reported.

» RELATED: Rare tick-borne illness worries some medical professionals

Some bite victims will experience a hive-like rash or a dangerous anaphylactic reaction about four hours after eating meat. 

» RELATED: WATCH: Young girl left temporarily paralyzed illustrates dangers of tick bites

Such allergies are still incredibly rare and the government hasn’t issued any health warnings yet, but according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the distribution, range and abundance of the Lone Star tick has increased steadily in the past 20 to 30 years.

» RELATED: Rare tick-borne illness worries some medical professionals “We expect with warming temperatures, the tick is going to slowly make its way northwards and westward and cause more problems than they’re already causing,” Ronald Staff, allergist and clinical professor of medicine, told Business Insider.

» RELATED: Girl dies from possible tick bite

Saff said he's now seeing patients every week who have been bitten by ticks and developed the meat allergy.

The best thing to do while scientists continue research to track and understand the species is to try to prevent tick bites overall.

» RELATED: Woman loses arms, legs after tick bite 

The CDC recommends avoiding tick habitats, using insect repellents with DEET or permethrin and actively checking for ticks after you’ve been outdoors.

Click here to read more on tick prevention and removal tips.

Guns kill nearly 1,300 children a year in U.S., study finds

On Monday, the American Academy of Pediatrics released a study that will be in the July issue of “Pediatrics” and its recommendations in response to the study. “Childhood Firearm Injuries in the United States” is the largest study to look at the number of gun-related injuries and death in children and adolescents. It looked at numbers from National Vital Statistics System, the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System and the National Violent Death Reporting System.

>> Read more trending news

Here’s what it found:

  • On average, 1,297 children a year die in the U.S. from gunshot wounds and 5,790 are treated for a gunshot wound.
  • Death from a firearm is the third-leading cause of death for children in the U.S. behind illness/congenital defect and motor vehicle injury.
  • 53 percent of gun deaths in children were homicides, 38 percent were suicides, 6 percent were unintentional deaths, and 3 percent were due to legal intervention or undetermined intent.
  • Homicide deaths by firearms in children have declined, but suicide deaths are on the rise.
  • 4.2 percent of children ages 0 to 17 in the United States have witnessed a shooting in the past year.
  • 82 percent of children killed by guns were boys.
  • Children 13-17 years old had a 12-times higher rate of being killed by a firearm than children 12 and younger.
  • Race mattered: The annual firearm homicide rate for African-American children (3.5 per 100,000) was nearly twice as high as the rate for American Indian children (2.2 per 100,000), 4 times higher than the rate for Hispanic children (0.8 per 100,000), and ∼10 times higher than the rate for white children and Asian-American children (each 0.4 per 100,000).
  • The suicide rate was highest for white and American Indian children (each 2.2 per 100,000), almost four times the amount for African-American (0.6 per 100,000) and Hispanic (0.5 per 100,000) children and over 5 times the rate for Asian-American children (0.4 per 100,000).
  • The rate of unintentional firearm deaths for African-American children was twice as high (0.2 per 100 000) as the rate for white children (0.1 per 100,000) and 4 times the rate for Hispanic children (0.05 per 100,000).
  • Southern states and parts of the Midwest had the highest rate of firearm homicides among children.
  • Firearm suicides are more evenly distributed among states, but higher in Western states.
  • In younger children, homicides often happen in a multivictim scenario and by family conflict.
  • Older children were more likely to die from crime and violence.
  • A shooter playing with the gun was the most common reason for an unintentional firearm death for all children.
  • Of children who committed suicide by firearm, 60 percent used a handgun, 42 percent had a crisis in the past, 71 percent had relationship problems, 34 percent were depressed, 26 percent had a clinically diagnosed mental health problem, 18 percent were receiving mental health treatment and 26 percent disclosed their intent to die by suicide to someone. Most spent 10 minutes or less thinking about it before they did it.

What are pediatricians to do with this information? And what are parents supposed to do?

Dr. Eliot W. Nelson of the University of Vermont wrote the academy’s response recommendations for its physicians:

  1. Ask parents if there are guns in their house.
  2. Do not get in a debate about their rights to have a gun.
  3. Talk about safe storage practices such as a gun safe and lock, storing guns unloaded and storing bullets separately.

New 'tan in a bottle’ drug could prevent skin cancer, study says

A new kind of “tan in a bottle” could give you the sun-kissed skin you want while lowering your risk of skin cancer, the most commonly diagnosed cancer in the United States.

» RELATED: Study finds 73 percent of sunscreens don’t even work — how to find one that does 

That’s according to new research published Tuesday in the journal Cell Reports, by a team of scientists from Massachusetts General Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute.

The drug, which is in liquid form, mimics the effect of sunlight on the skin without the sun’s harmful UV rays, tricking the skin into producing a brownish pigmentation of melanin.

>> Read more trending news

So far, according to the study, it has been tested on mixed-gender adult mice and skin samples considered surgical waste.

» RELATED: Here are the 19 best sunscreens for kids, according to experts 

The drug bronzes the skin and because it’s all done without UV rays, it could potentially slow the appearance of skin aging.

But the researchers aren’t trying to create the next consumer beauty product.

“Our real goal is a novel strategy for protecting skin from UV radiation and cancer,” David Fisher, one of the researchers, told BBC News.

» RELATED: The 14 most dangerous sunscreens for kids, according to experts 

“Dark pigment is associated with a lower risk of all forms of skin cancer -- that would be really huge.”

Fisher sees the development and inclusion of this drug as as an ingredient as something that could enhance sunscreen protection and protect against skin cancer.

“There is unequivocal evidence that sunscreens are protective against several types of skin cancer,” he told Time Magazine. “But there is also unequivocal evidence that they are not enough. Just look at the data -- skin is the most common site of cancer in people despite the embarrassing fact that UV radiation is broadly recognized as a cause in all common forms of skin cancer.”

» RELATED: 9 tips for improving your summer tan

According to the Atlanta-based Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, while many other cancer rates have declined, skin cancer rates continue to rise.

Nearly 5 million people are treated for skin cancer in the U.S. every year at an estimated cost of $8.1 billion.

In addition, melanoma causes more deaths than any other type of skin cancer -- more than 9,000 deaths each year.

» RELATED: Mom warns other parents after baby burned by sunscreen 

But the scientists said more research needs to be done to confirm the drug works in people and not just in samples of human skin cells in petri dishes.

Click here to read the full study report.

United Pet Group recalls 5 brands of rawhide dog chews

United Pet Group has issued a voluntary recall for multiple brands of rawhide dog chew products that were distributed to retail outlets and sold online in the U.S. 

The recall – which covers the brands American Beefhide, Digest-eeze, Healthy Hide, Healthy Hide Good-n-Fun and Healthy Hide Good-n-Fit – was issued after United Pet Group identified that certain rawhide chew manufacturing facilities located in Mexico and Columbia, and one its suppliers in Brazil, were using an ammonium compound mixture as a processing aid in the making of the rawhide chews.

The compound is an anti-microbial chemical that is approved for cleaning food processing equipment, but it has not been approved in the U.S. as a processing aid in the production of rawhide chews for dogs.

This recall is limited to dog chew products that contain rawhide. Only products with lot codes listed on the back of the package that start with AH, AV, A, AI, AO, or AB and which list expiration dates from 06/01/2019 through 05/31/2020 are affected by this recall. This includes all package sizes and/or weights.

>> Click here to read the full recall announcement on the FDA website

The primary complaint received was that the affected product had an unpleasant odor. Diarrhea and vomiting were also reported from owners.

Exposure to quaternary ammonium compounds through direct ingestion may cause the following symptoms in dogs: reduced appetite, and gastric irritation including diarrhea and vomiting. 

>> Read more trending news

The affected product was distributed nationwide from United Pet Group’s Edwardsville, Illinois, distribution facility. All of the dog chew products included in the voluntary recall identify an expiration date ranging from 06/01/2019 through 05/31/2020 located on the back of the package.

Consumers who have purchased the products described above are urged to dispose of the product or return it directly to United Pet Group or to the retail establishment where they initially purchased the product for full refund.

Tuna recalled over possible hepatitis A contamination

A Hawaii-based company is recalling frozen yellowfin tuna after samples tested positive for hepatitis A.

Restaurants in at least three states – California, Texas and Oklahoma – are believed to have received shipments of the fish, according to a Food and Drug Administration press release

>> Read the press release

According to the press release, Hilo Fish Co. "began recalling tuna sourced from Sustainable Seafood Co. and Santa Cruz Seafood” on May 18 after the tuna tested positive for the hepatitis A virus. In Texas, three Sysco locations received shipments of the tuna, which means that it could have gone out to any number of restaurants. While one shipment did go to New York, the New York State Department of Health stated that the product was not served. The Centers for Disease Control is not currently aware of any illnesses stemming from the tuna but noted that people who have been vaccinated for hepatitis A are not at risk of contracting the virus.

>> See a list of establishments that may have been affected

Specifically, the recalled products include vacuum packed 8-ounce tuna steaks with an expiration date of Oct. 1, 2018, and 15-pound cases of frozen tuna cubes dated April 1, 2019.

Hepatitis A is a liver disease that causes fatigue, jaundice, abdominal pain and a number of other symptoms. Individuals who are worried that they might have contracted the virus are advised to contact a health professional.

>> Read more trending news

The tuna apparently originated in Indonesia, and the Hawaii Department of Health notified the FDA on May 1 that one of the cubes tested positive for Hepatitis A. Another company, Tropic Fish Hawaii LLC, quickly recalled fish sent to customers in Oahu, but the FDA reported that “U.S. mainland and other Hawaiian islands were not affected by the recall.”

Read more here.

Florida mom gives birth to 13-pound baby; see the photos

As Christine Corbitt quickly approached her due date, her stomach was undeniable.

>> Watch the news report here

“Towards the end of my pregnancy, I was like, 'Oh my gosh. She’s just so huge,'" Corbitt said.

>> On ActionNewsJax.com: PHOTOS: Orange Park mom gives birth to 13-pound baby girl

Indeed, Carleigh Brooke Corbitt was huge. At 13 pounds, 5 ounces, she was the largest newborn Dr. Eric Edelenbos has ever delivered.

“When the baby was coming out, I was like, 'Is this baby ever going to end?' Everybody in the room kind of just stopped during the delivery and was like, 'Oh my gosh. Oh my gosh,'” he said.

>> Read more trending news

We were there as mom and baby went for their three-week checkup. Carleigh was decked out in pink and white and didn't fuss a bit. She’s clearly happy and healthy, but struggled with gestational diabetes early on.

“I’ve had nine and 10-pound babies and I figured maybe she'd be 10 pounds. I’d have another 10-pound baby, but she was a surprise,” Corbitt said.

Carleigh had to stay in the NICU for a bit while her blood sugar levels were checked and she got the all-clear. The Corbitts say a number of media outlets have contacted them about Carleigh's large entry into the world, but ActionNewsJax officially gave her her TV debut.

As for Christine, she plans on taking some much-needed rest – for good this time.

“I’m done. I’m done. No more babies for me,” she said with a smile.

Angry dad says he overdosed on heroin to scare son into rehab

The heroin epidemic in America has left thousands dead and ravaged countless families. One father in Brooklyn, New York, told the New York Post that he was infuriated when he found his son’s heroin stash. In fact, he said he was so mad that he shot up the drug himself just to show his son a lesson – then overdosed himself.

Sergey Gnatovskiy told the Post, “I [tried] to send him to rehab. He promised me he was going to go, and I found it again.”

>> Read more trending news

His son reportedly came home Wednesday afternoon to find his father passed out on the floor and had to use CPR and Narcan to bring his dad back from an overdose that threatened his life. It was an eerie moment, considering that his father has had to do the same thing on four different occasions with his son.

But Gnatovskiy said his son has been scared into returning to rehab.

“After seeing this, I definitely want to go," his son said. "I’ve been doing this since I was 15. I’m 23 now; I can’t keep doing this.”

The father said he doesn’t remember the moment. He only remembers going to turn off the television and waking up surrounded by medical personnel.

Gnatovskiy said his son has caused him a world of trouble. A fight in Gnatovskiy's apartment led to an eviction notice, kicking both father and son out of the apartment at the end of May. Gnatovskiy reportedly is only allowed to stay if he can prove that his son is no longer living with him.

The dad became emotional, yelling, “If I lose you — I don’t know. Look what you made me do yesterday? I’ll give you my home, my car, my heart. I don’t want to lose you.”

Read more here.

Babies may sleep longer in own rooms, study finds

Baby not sleeping well? It could be because you’re sharing a room with your little one.

Last October, the American Academy of Pediatrics issued new recommendations that at least until six months, preferably until age 1, your child should share a room with you, but not the same bed.

Now, a study that will be published in the July issue of Pediatrics found that babies who shared a room with their parents slept less than those who did not. The study, called Intervention Nurses Start Infants Growing on Health Trajectories, studied 230 mother-infant pairs from January 2012 to March 2014. The infants fell into three categories: those who were independent sleepers by 4 months (62 percent), those who were independent sleepers between 4 months and 9 months (27 percent), and those who were still sleeping in the same room as their parents at 9 months (11 percent).

>> Read more trending news

The study was actually about obesity prevention, but researchers found that there were differences in bedtime routines. Babies who shared a room at 4 months were less likely to be put to bed before 8 p.m. They also were more likely to have something in their bed that shouldn’t be there, such as a blanket, pillow or stuffed animal, and were more likely to be brought into their parents’ bed sometime in the night.

How long babies slept was also different. By 9 months, the babies who had been sleeping independently at 4 months slept a stretch of 7 hours and 49 minutes. The room-sharing babies were sleeping only 7 hours in a row at 9 months.

What researchers found was it was all about establishing those bedtime routines: when a baby gets put to sleep, how often a baby is fed in the middle of the night and whether a baby is fed back to sleep or goes back to sleep on his own.

The American Academy of Pediatrics doesn’t want to revise its recommendations about room sharing, but it does acknowledge that parents want to get more sleep and that more research needs to be done to consider whether it should reverse its new policy.

5 tips to keep you from getting sick on vacation

It’s easy to get sick when you’re traveling, because your immune system is exposed to new environments and germs it isn’t used to fighting. Plus, if you tend to eat less healthy food on vacation, your body might be missing some key nutrients it needs to stay in tip-top shape.

>> Read more trending news

Use these tips to keep yourself healthy:

Use hand sanitizer

You may want to use hand sanitizer after any outing in a public space, which, let’s be honest, is pretty much constant when traveling. After riding public transportation or in a cab, be sure to clean your hands with sanitizer. You don’t know who touched the handrails, doors or ticket machines before you.

>> Related: 10 ways to save money on gasoline during your summer travels

Carry sanitizing cloths

If you’re traveling by bus, airplane or train, be sure to wipe down your tray table and arm rests, as these places often harbor cold germs. In fact, airplane tray tables were recently found to be the most germ-filled surface on an airplane. Carry sanitizing cloths for wiping down surfaces as well as hand sanitizer.

>> Related: These 5 travel apps will help you find the best restaurants, WiFi and bathrooms in any city

Stay hydrated

Drinking water is especially important when flying. The combination of cabin pressure and dry, recirculated air in planes can rob your skin of moisture and lead to dehydration. Water will keep you naturally hydrated and feeling great for when you arrive at your final destination.

>> Related: These 5 tips will leave your skin glowing even after a long flight

Exercise, exercise, exercise

Not everyone wants to exercise on vacation, but dietitians recommend getting as much exercise as possible to keep you feeling great. Walking tours and bicycle rentals are great ways to not only learn about your destination, but to also burn calories in the process.

>> Related: 10 road trip tips for every traveler

Fight motion sickness

If you’re prone to bouts of motion sickness, your doctor may be willing to write you a prescription for promethazine, an anti-nausea medication used by NASA to fight space sickness and recommended by Dr. Joanne Feldman of UCLA’s Department of Emergency Medicine. Feldman is considered an expert in motion-sickness treatments.

200 items
Results 21 - 30 of 200 < previous next >