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Chicago O'Hare Airport employees plan strike after Thanksgiving

Employees at Chicago's O'Hare International Airport announced Monday that they plan to strike on Nov. 29, according to multiple reports.

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Service Employees International Union Local 1 announced the date outside the airport Monday morning, The Associated Press reported. The workers say they want the public's support and wouldn't want to mess up anyone's holiday plans.

About 500 workers committed to a strike after a vote last week. The workers are trying to organize with the union's help. They work mainly for private contractors at the airport and include baggage handlers, cabin cleaners, janitors, and wheelchair attendants.

The workers are seeking union rights and a $15 per hour wage.

It wasn't immediately clear how such a strike would affect operations at O'Hare, which is one of the nation's busiest airports. The Chicago Department of Aviation has said it doesn't anticipate any disruption in service.

The ultimate insider's guide the Macy's Thanksgiving parade

Planning to visit NYC for the big parade? We've got you covered with when/where/how tips to get the most out of this one-of-a-kind holiday experience.

Budget Travel is based in New York City, and we get just as swept up in the city’s holiday lights, music, and energy as any visitor. With the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade coming up, we decided to take a peek behind the scenes to provide you with some of the best advice for getting the most out of this annual extravaganza.

Be a New Yorker for a Day

"Be part of the hustle and bustle and embrace the energy of the Big Apple at holiday time," says Wesley Whatley, creative director, Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade. "Plus, a hotel near the route could be a bathroom lifesaver on Thanksgiving morning." It's fun to be a “New Yorker for a day” and leave the car at home. Or, if you must drive, park on either the far west or east side of Manhattan and take public transportation to the parade route. Before the big day, get a Metro Card for boarding subways and buses to avoid lines. Walking is always an option (and will help burn off some of the calories that you’ll be consuming later in the day).

Don't Make the Out-of-Towner's No. 1 Parade Mistake

"Do not stand below 38th Street, the parade's 'quiet zone,'" says Whatley. Parade participants and performers use the quiet zone to prepare for their "closeup" on TV in Herald Square, and you will completely miss out on exciting parade music and performances in this area. Want to know more about viewing the parade? The complete route can be found at macys.com/parade.

The "Best Place" to Watch the Parade Is...

"Ever since the classic film Miracle on 34th Street, the dream parade viewing location has been from a Central Park West apartment on the 6th floor overlooking the route with the park as a backdrop," says Whatley. "But, since most of us don't have that kind of access, a close alternative is to approach the route from the west along Central Park West or the south along Central Park South - it's still early in the march, energy is high and the view of Central Park with our large helium balloons passing by is an iconic Macy's Parade experience!" The parade should take about 90 minutes to pass you by from the opening band to Santa Claus’s sleigh.

Ensure Safety & Happiness for Your Whole Crew

"Dress for the weather," says Whatley. "Pack extra hand and foot warmers and dress in layers.  Also, wear rain-proof coats and boots. NYC weather in late November can change quickly and you want to stay comfortable, warm and dry!"The NYPD have a large presence to ensure a safe and happy morning for all, but follow your usual common-sense travel practices: Keep your valuables to a minimum; avoid carrying around oversize backpacks and luggage; always pay attention to your surroundings. And, as we always say here in NYC, “if you see something, say something.”

The ultimate insider's guide to the Macy's Thanksgiving parade

Planning to visit NYC for the big parade? We've got you covered with when/where/how tips to get the most out of this one-of-a-kind holiday experience.

Budget Travel is based in New York City, and we get just as swept up in the city’s holiday lights, music, and energy as any visitor. With the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade coming up, we decided to take a peek behind the scenes to provide you with some of the best advice for getting the most out of this annual extravaganza.

Be a New Yorker for a day

"Be part of the hustle and bustle and embrace the energy of the Big Apple at holiday time," says Wesley Whatley, creative director, Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade. "Plus, a hotel near the route could be a bathroom lifesaver on Thanksgiving morning." It's fun to be a “New Yorker for a day” and leave the car at home. Or, if you must drive, park on either the far west or east side of Manhattan and take public transportation to the parade route. Before the big day, get a Metro Card for boarding subways and buses to avoid lines. Walking is always an option (and will help burn off some of the calories that you’ll be consuming later in the day).

Don't make the out-of-towner's no. 1 parade mistake

"Do not stand below 38th Street, the parade's 'quiet zone,'" says Whatley. Parade participants and performers use the quiet zone to prepare for their "closeup" on TV in Herald Square, and you will completely miss out on exciting parade music and performances in this area. Want to know more about viewing the parade? The complete route can be found at macys.com/parade.

The "best place" to watch the parade is...

"Ever since the classic film Miracle on 34th Street, the dream parade viewing location has been from a Central Park West apartment on the 6th floor overlooking the route with the park as a backdrop," says Whatley. "But, since most of us don't have that kind of access, a close alternative is to approach the route from the west along Central Park West or the south along Central Park South - it's still early in the march, energy is high and the view of Central Park with our large helium balloons passing by is an iconic Macy's Parade experience!" The parade should take about 90 minutes to pass you by from the opening band to Santa Claus’s sleigh.

Ensure safety & comfort for your whole crew

"Dress for the weather," says Whatley. "Pack extra hand and foot warmers and dress in layers. Also, wear rainproof coats and boots. NYC weather in late November can change quickly and you want to stay comfortable, warm and dry!" The NYPD has a large presence to ensure a safe and happy morning for all, but follow your usual common-sense travel practices: Keep your valuables to a minimum; avoid carrying around oversize backpacks and luggage; always pay attention to your surroundings. And, as we always say here in NYC, “if you see something, say something.”

See More From Budget Travel:60 Gifts Every Traveler Wants!Stress-Melting Holiday Travel Tips16 Awesome American Winter Trips

United Airlines to ban full-size carry-ons for cheaper fares

Cheaper fares don't come without extra costs elsewhere.

United Airlines announced Tuesday that it will begin offering Basic Economy fares but will restrict those fare users from bringing full-size carryons on flights. The Chicago Tribune reported that only personal items, that can be stored below seats, can be brought on board.

>> Read more trending stories

USA Today reported that the move comes as United, one of the major airlines in the U.S., attempts to compete with low-cost carriers like Frontier Airlines and Spirit Airlines.

“United’s move to encourage fewer carry-on bags, similar to practices at Frontier and Spirit, will create a safer cabin for passengers and crew," President of the Association of Flight Attendants union Sara Nelson said in a statement. "Excess bags in the cabin lead to flight attendant injuries, slower boarding times, and passenger altercations.

"Flight attendants manage these safety and security issues often under the pressure of on-time departures and during a critical period for ensuring the overall security of the flight," she said. "Footage from recent aircraft evacuations show that passengers grabbing these bags risks the lives of everyone onboard."

Other restrictions include the inability to exchange or refund basic fares and select a seat ahead of time. Basic Economy customers will also board last.

Despite some restrictions, United said Basic Economy customers will still be able to have some perks, including snacks, Wi-Fi and in-flight entertainment. Basic Economy sales will begin in early 2017.

Why I Took a Road Trip for My Honeymoon

Novelist Nora Zelevansky’s honeymoon was so swoon-worthy and budget-minded that you'll want to steal the idea. Here’s the storybook tale, in her own words.

Despite what Pinterest would have us believe, weddings are stressful. Even “carefree” moments are scheduled with military precision. In travel and in life, I don’t love that kind of structure. So when it came to my honeymoon, I wasn’t inspired to race around airports, making connections. All I wanted was to unwind, wear hoodies, and eat carbs.

My husband, Andrew, and I have always shared a love of road trips: the flexibility, the spontaneity—the simple pleasure of serendipity. California makes an especially good backdrop for such an easygoing journey, with its dramatic shifts in landscape; drive a few hours and you’ve crossed from desert into lush greenery, from the shore into mountains.

Andrew and I took our time getting hitched, exclusively dating in L.A. for years beforehand. By our wedding, we had driven as far south as Rosarito, Mexico, and as far north as Portland, Oregon. So, for us, there was an implicit romance to this honeymoon concept: As anyone who has ever driven cross-country knows, road trips represent a kind of shared freedom.

We decided to do this one like the “adults” we suddenly felt we must be. This wouldn’t be some haphazard slog to worn-down shacks labeled “cottages.” We’d still hold fast to our money by eating inexpensive snacks on the road—albeit high-end Kettle Chips and coconut water this time around—but since we were saving on airfare, we would splurge on the high-end hotels I’d always fantasized about visiting.

On a crisp fall day in early November, with The Clash blaring, we rode that tailwind of change up the 5 freeway, away from the past year’s stresses. 

As is often the case with memories, when I look back on the trip, I am rewarded with ephemeral impressions: crisp breezes carrying scents of salty sea and rosemary, bucolic walks through what felt like enchanted forests, strolls in impossibly quaint towns sampling olive oil and coconut sorbet, a perfect song erupting from the radio, laughter as we relived our wedding or happened upon a pen of adorable baby fainting goats. Still, one experience from each leg of the journey stands out—four in total. They are the chapters of my storybook dream trip, hard-won with budgeting, and savored to this day, the edges gilded in my mind.

I. Sausalito

We landed first on the other side of the bridge from San Francisco in lesser-known Sausalito at Cavallo Point Lodge, a hotel converted from a onetime U.S. Army post, Fort Baker (cavallopoint.com). To me, it was the embodiment of the Golden State’s signature relaxed luxury: at once historic and contemporary, organic and geometric, pampering and utilitarian. I have gauzy memories of enjoying our spa treatments and nature hikes. But the moment that crystallized for me was just after we arrived: Alone in our impeccable, earth-toned room, we peeled off our jackets and looked, spellbound, out the large windows. The Golden Gate bridge loomed orange above us; its lights twinkled as the sun went down.

II. Point Reyes

Our next stop was Point Reyes, where oyster farms line the foggy, protected shoreline. At Manka’s Inverness Lodge, high-end log cabins sit nestled among redwoods and firs (mankas.com). Open since 1917, the hotel had recently lost their lauded restaurant to a fire. As a result, simple yet transcendent meals were brought to our room. The kitchen culled all their ingredients from within a couple of miles, and you could taste it. One morning, we opened our front door to find a tray waiting. We carried it to our dining nook, where we unwrapped impossibly fresh yogurt, homemade granola, local apples, and hot cinnamon buns made from scratch, served straight from the oven. It was the best breakfast of my life.

III. Napa Valley

At Calistoga Ranch, the Napa Valley wine country stop on our journey, our room felt like the world’s most lavish treehouse (calistogaranch.aubergeresorts.com). Tucked amidst greenery, an actual oak grew through the sun deck beside an indoor/outdoor fireplace. We adored the bathroom: Beyond two distinct sleek sink areas opposite each other (what Andrew and I consider “living the dream”), an outdoor shower and garden awaited. We hardly wanted to leave the room, but eventually, we made it outside, accidentally happening upon quirky Prager Winery and Port Works (pragerport.com). My only previous experience with the sweet drink involved stealing it from a friend’s parents’ liquor cabinet when I was a teenager. But here we swirled it, inhaled it, really tasted it. Andrew ended up falling hard for a tawny port, tucking it into our trunk before continuing to our final destination.

IV. Big Sur

We had spent enough time in Big Sur in years past to hear buzz about Post Ranch Inn (postranchinn.com). We couldn’t wait to try it for ourselves. The rumors were true: Our room was extraordinary, massively windowed and overlooking rolling hillsides where wild turkeys roamed. In the brisk fall evening, Andrew suggested that we throw on plush robes, grab wine, and hustle to one of the hot plunges embedded in the cliffside. I was initially resistant because of the chill, but as soon as we climbed into the warm water, I knew he’d been right. The moon was full and bright. Gazing out over the dramatic cliffs, we passed the ambrosial wine back and forth, swigging from the bottle. Just when it seemed like the moment couldn’t get more idyllic, we turned to find a deer regarding us calmly from just feet away. It was as though a fairy godmother herself were designing our own personal fable.

When the sun rose on the final morning of our honeymoon, we were melancholy, of course. The afterglow of a hotly anticipated journey is bittersweet. But as we wound through peaks and valleys on our way home, luckily we weren’t on anyone else’s schedule…and we took our sweet time.

Nora Zelevansky is the author of Will You Won’t You Want Me? (out April 19) and Semi-Charmed Life.

See More From Budget Travel:America's Most Spectacular Drives48 Perfectly Romantic Hours in ParisHoneymoon Paradise for Less (You MUST See the Perks!)Surprise! These Are the World's Top Honeymoon DestinationsHave You Taken Our Top 25 Road Trips?

Three-Day Weekend: Nassau & Paradise Island

Beaches! Sky juice! Water slides! Conch fritters! Nassau and Paradise Island, Bahamas, are a short hop from anywhere on the East Coast, making the perfect island getaway closer—and more affordable—than ever. All you'll need is a valid passport and your bathing suit!

My hands are shaking and my knees are weak; I'm not in love, I'm climbing the steps of the Atlantis Paradise Island Resort's Mayan Temple, ever so slowly approaching the entrance to Leap of Faith, the largest, steepest water slide I've ever been on. Not only that, this seven-story slide will take me through the Mayan Temple Shark Lagoon—a large aquarium full of Caribbean reef sharks. Gulp.

I've spent most of the morning chatting with people who have just been on the impressive-looking slide, trying really hard to talk myself into it. By the afternoon, I've rationalized everything—the drop, the angle, the speed—and am finally ready to take the plunge. And then I find out there's another, easier way to see the sharks up close: another Mayan Temple attraction called the Serpent Slide that doesn't involve a terrifying drop down a 60-foot tall almost-vertical body slide, but rather a fun ride on an inner tube that ends in a large, clear tunnel, slowly taking you through the shark-filled aquarium.

So, yes, I may have totally chickened out on the big slide, but at least this way I was able to glide past the giant sharks, and believe me, that was terrifying enough!

Don't have enough time to visit all 700+ islands of the Bahamas? Start with New Providence Island, home to Nassau, Paradise Island, and enough beaches and Bahamian culture to satisfy every foodie and history buff in your arsenal. Plus, the U.S. Dollar is on par with the Bahamian Dollar, so you don't have to worry about the exchange rate, and the locals are super-friendly. What's not to love?

Experience all the perks of the Atlantis Resort—for less!

We've all seen photos of the iconic pink towers of the Atlantis Resort's Royal Towers, but did you know there's a way to experience all the perks of the resort without actually ponying up the big bucks to stay there? The secret: stay next door at Comfort Suites Paradise Island (from $130 in early December). Not only will your nightly rate give you complimentary Wi-Fi and daily breakfast, it also includes day passes to Atlantis, which normally run $150 per person, for free. Spend the day taking on the water slides in more than 20 swimming areas and 11 themed pools, lounging on white-sand beaches, or feasting at the one of the resort's fine dining restaurants, then unwind by the pool and bar at Comfort Suites Paradise Island if you need a break from all the excitement. Don't miss the Lazy River Rapids (which feel like they're part lazy river, part wave pool!) and of course, the legendary water slides of the Mayan Temple that let you float or slide through an aquarium tank full of Caribbean reef sharks! Note: It's also worth checking for flash sales on the Atlantis Resort website for extra savings if you really want to stay on the property; rates at the resort's Coral Towers start at $170 per night in early December.

Enjoy tasty Bahamian fare—conch fritters, anyone?

Don't miss the Bites of Nassau Food Tour a three-hour food tasting and cultural walking tour through the colorful streets of Downtown Nassau, with stops at six local restaurants and specialty shops—like an artisanal chocolate tasting at the Graycliff Beer Garden & Chocolatier or a lesson in local Bahamian herbs and spices that will change the way you look at medicine the next time you have a cold (curry spices are used in cooking to treat inflammation and coughs, who knew?). You'll also stop at Van Breugel's Bistro & Bar for Caribbean fusion dishes; Bahamian Cookin' Restaurant & Bar, where the locals go for traditional eats; Athena's Cafe, the island's oldest Greek restaurant; and the Tortuga Rum Cake Company to taste flavored rum cakes that are baked daily with five-year aged rum (from $69 per adult, $49 for children ages 12 and under, children under 3 are free). For a fun, super-authentic dining experience, check out the Fish Fry at Arawak Cay, a collection of small, local restaurants just outside Downtown Nassau where you can sample Bahamian favorites like cracked conch (pronounced "conk" by the way) and Sky Juice, a milky-white concoction made with gin, coconut water, sweet milk, cinnamon, sugar, and fresh nutmeg. A number of locals I spoke to recommended Oh Andros as their favorite spot for food in Arawak Cay and Twin Brothers for the best daiquiri cocktails. I concur.

Visit Fort Charlotte, The Queen's Staircase, and a Pirate Museum!

History buffs will love exploring Nassau's old forts, originally built to protect the island from invaders, but luckily, none has ever had to be used in battle. Fort Charlotte is about a five-minute walk from Downtown Nassau and features displays of how the complex was built and what it was like to be stationed there in the 17th century (spoiler alert: it wasn't easy!) Admission is $5 for adults, $3 for seniors, $2 for children ages 6-12, ages five and under get in free. Closer to Downtown, Fort Fincastle sits at the top of Bennet's Hill overlooking the city. To reach it, climb the Queen's Staircase, a 102-foot tall staircase built by slaves in the late-1700s and later named in honor of Queen Victoria, who is credited with abolishing slavery in 1837—or do what I did and take a taxi to Fort Fincastle and make your way down the Queen's Staircase instead (admission is free for both sites). Pirate lovers will want to visit the Pirates of Nassau Museum, home to an interactive pirate attraction that feels like you've become part of the Pirates of the Caribbean ride—keep an eye out for the pirate ship Revenge and get your close up of Blackbeard himself ($13 for adults, $6.50 for children ages 4-17).

See the Straw Markets

Brush up on your negotiating skills and pick up some locally-made handicrafts from the Straw Market on Bay Street in Downtown Nassau, a great place to find hand-woven straw bags, hats, and other Bahamian crafts and souvenirs for your friends back home. Smaller straw markets are also located on Paradise Island and in the Cable Beach resort area about a 20-minute drive from Nassau.

Go beyond Downtown Nassau

If you plan on renting a car to discover the rest of New Providence Island, keep in mind that everyone drives on the left in the Bahamas, so proceed with caution, especially if you're not used to it. I opted for taxis, a great option if you're traveling with a group, or an easy 10-minute water taxi ride to get between Paradise Island and Downtown Nassau ($4 one way, $8 round-trip, every half hour). Another option, especially if you're staying along Cable Beach or areas west, is to hop a ride on the jitneys into and out of Downtown Nassau, a great way to chat with locals who are doing the same thing (each ride is about $1.50). For a nice, quiet stay in Paradise Island, head east and try the Best Western Plus Bay View Suites for a relaxing romantic getaway. It's a five-minute walk to the nearest beach, and also a great option for large or multi-generational families traveling together who might need more space (from $160 per night).

Explore the hidden gems of Paradise Island

Tucked away on the eastern end of Paradise Island about a 15-minute walk from the Atlantis Resort area, you'll find Versailles Gardens, a lovely, terraced, European-style garden modeled after its namesake in France. The Versailles Gardens are located on part of the One & Only Ocean Club's property along Paradise Island Drive, but are free and open to the public 24/7, and as you can imagine, a popular spot for photos and weddings. You'll also find the remains of an original 14th-century French Cloister across the street that's part of the complex, purchased by William Randolph Hearst and later by Huntington Hartford, who brought it with him to the Bahamas.

The best part: it's closer than you think

I was surprised how fast the flight was from JFK, a mere 2.5 hours! Catch a nonstop flight on JetBlue from JFK, Boston, Orlando, Washington National, or Fort Lauderdale; fly on United for nonstop flights from Chicago, Houston, and Newark; SouthWest Airlines for nonstop flights from Baltimore; American Airlines for nonstop flights from Miami, Philadelphia, and Charlotte; Delta for nonstop flights from JFK and Atlanta; or Bahamasair for nonstop flights from Miami and Fort Lauderdale. Keep an eye out for flash sales by following your favorite airline on social media or signing up for their email newsletters so the deals come straight to your inbox.

See More From Budget Travel:Great Getaways: Puerto RicoGreat Getaways: FijiThree-Day Weekend: CuracaoThe 101 Most Beautiful Places on Earth35 EASY Solo Trips to Try!

The city of Denver doesn't know who runs the 'City of Denver' Instagram account

The @cityofdenver Instagram account boasts hundreds of photos of Denver's skyline, popular landmarks and Colorado's natural landscape.

>> Read more trending stories 

The account has 150,000 followers, and posted photos generally receive thousands of likes.

But the official city of Denver doesn't know who's running the account.

A photo posted by Denver Colorado (@cityofdenver) on Sep 10, 2016 at 1:39pm PDT

According to KUSA, an unknown person or group has been "squatting" on the account name for years.

Jenny Schiavone, who works for Denver's marketing department, said city officials have tried unsuccessfully for "a while" to find out who's operating the account.

A photo posted by Denver Colorado (@cityofdenver) on Oct 2, 2016 at 11:53pm PDT

The account, which can easily be mistaken as an official one, also links to a cityofdenver.us website, where the official city of Denver logo is posted. 

But Schiavone said no one from the city has made a complaint to Instagram.

"We haven't asked them to give it up, since they had it first, and they really do have fabulous content, but we've asked them not to use our website and logo," Schiavone said.

Schiavone said the city, which has discussed creating an official Instagram, would have to find another name for the official account. So far, @therealcityofdenver has been suggested.

Alaska Airlines to make history with flight powered by wood

Alaska Airlines will make history Monday flying the first commercial flight using the world's first renewable, alternative jet fuel made from forest residuals --the limbs and branches that remain after managed forests are harvested.

The forest residuals used to power Alaska Airlines Flight 4 was sourced from tribal lands and private forestry operations in the Pacific Northwest and was produced through the efforts of the Washington State University-led Northwest Advanced Renewables Alliance, the airline said.

>> Read more trending stories  

The NARA initiative is funded by a five-year, $40 million grant from the U.S. Department of Agriculture's National Institute of Food and Agriculture.

Believed to be the world's first alternative jet fuel produced from wood, the blended fuel meets international standards, allowing it to be used safely for Monday's commercial flight.

The flight will depart from Sea-Tac Airport at 8:20 a.m. and will land at Reagan National Airport in Washington, D.C. and will be met by USDA Secretary Tom Vilsack at 4:10 p.m.

In June, the airline operated the first commercial flights using a 20 percent blend of renewable alcohol-to-jet biofuel produced by a renewable chemical and biofuel company. 

Airline captain speaks over intercom to diffuse election-fueled conflict between passengers

Tensions are running high across the country in the wake of the shocking presidential election that rocked the nation last Tuesday.

There have been numerous accounts of racially charged attacks, protests, fights and arguments being documented by individuals on both sides of the political aisle.

Now another incident has come to light that happened on a United Airlines flight from San Francisco to Puerto Vallarta, Mexico, in which the flight's captain and the flight crew were forced to intervene.

>> Read more trending stories  

According to the description with a video posted Friday on YouTube, a man in a "plaid shirt and camo cap" said something about being glad to have "kept his guns" to a black woman sitting next to him.

The woman started "crying and freaking out," and the United Airlines crew members were forced to separate the two individuals.

After the incident, the flight's captain got on the intercom system and made it clear that he would not tolerate any other such incidents.

"I understand everybody has their opinion; that's fine," the captain said. "If you support (Donald Trump), great. If you don't, I understand. However, we're out here to go to Puerto Vallarta, supposed to be having a good time, and what I do ask is that as people we have the common decency to respect each other's decisions and to get along on this three-hour and 13-minute flight so that we can have a good time when we get down there."

He continued: "Nobody is going to change their minds by arguing. And let's keep our opinions to ourselves on this particular matter at this particular time."

The captain also said that if anyone wanted to argue, they were not welcome on his flight.

"If there's anyone that has a problem with this, that needs to vent or rant or rave, there's another flight tomorrow," he said. "You're not going to be on this one. I hope that's clear."

After his message had concluded, passengers cheered in appreciation.

A United Airlines spokesperson, Maggie King, released a statement after the incident, saying that the captain "used the intercom to diffuse the situation and ensure the safety of everyone on board. The flight continued without any further reports of disturbance."

Plane makes emergency landing after snake found slithering overhead

Like a scene out of a movie, a pair of passengers caught a snake during a 2-hour Aeromexico flight on Sunday after passengers spotted it, according to a social media report.

>> Read more trending stories

Indalecio Medina, rector of Universidad Politecnica de la Region Laguna in Luchana, Coahuila, took to Twitter and Facebook on Sunday afternoon with a 27-second clip of the bright green snake moving near a plane's overhead bin.

"The flying snake," he wrote on Twitter. "A unique experience on the flight from Torreon-Mexico (City)."

The snake was found on flight 231, which makes the 500-mile trip once a day from Torreon, Coahuila, to Mexico City.

The airline confirmed that a snake was found on board a flight Sunday afternoon in a statement released to Publimetro.

The company is working to determine how the snake got on the plane.

"To Aeromexico, the safety of its passengers and crew is the highest priority," the company said in a statement.

Medina wrote on Facebook that he and another passenger caught the snake using a blanket and magazines to keep the snake still.

"I had to play snake catcher with a blanket, and we obviously gave it some magazines to read," he wrote. "But don't worry … The snake was alive and kicking, frightened but without having paid for its ticket. Best of all… (we got) priority landing at (Mexico City International Airport) and animal control was waiting for the unexpected traveler."

Animal control officers took custody of the snake without incident, Medina said.

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