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Posted: August 27, 2014

Do couples who smoke weed together stay together?

Rich Pedroncelli/AP
The bud of a marijuana plant grown by George and Jean Hanamoto is seen at their home in the Mendocino County community of Willits, Calif., Wednesday, May 28, 2008. Under a law passed in 2000, allows county residents to grow up to 25 marijuana plants for medical, recreational or personal use. A measure before county voters in the June 3 primary would scale back the law allowing only six plants to be grown. George Hanamoto, 74, who uses marijuana to relieve glaucoma and for back pain, said cutting plant limits would hurt people like him because growing conditions mean he can't always get the maximum out of each plant.(AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli)

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            Do couples who smoke weed together stay together?
The bud of a marijuana plant grown by George and Jean Hanamoto is seen at their home in the Mendocino County community of Willits, Calif., Wednesday, May 28, 2008. Under a law passed in 2000, allows county residents to grow up to 25 marijuana plants for medical, recreational or personal use. A measure before county voters in the June 3 primary would scale back the law allowing only six plants to be grown. George Hanamoto, 74, who uses marijuana to relieve glaucoma and for back pain, said cutting plant limits would hurt people like him because growing conditions mean he can't always get the maximum out of each plant.(AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli)

By Jasmine Bailey

In a hot-tempered marriage? 

Well, apparently one thing you can do to cool the jets down is light one up. 

According to a new study, couples who smoke marijuana together are less likely to be aggressive toward each other. 

WNYW: "Researchers at the University at Buffalo looked at couples over the first nine years of marriage. They found husbands and wives who both smoked marijuana at least two to three times a month reported the least amount of spousal abuse." 

Considering factors like alcohol use, the researchers surveyed 634 couples. They didn't elaborate on exactly why pot usage might lower the risk of intimate partner violence but did note, "It is possible, for example, that — similar to a drinking partnership — couples who use marijuana together may share similar values and social circles, and it is this similarity that is responsible for reducing the likelihood of conflict." 

However, the findings are contradicted by past studies, one showing marijuana actually has adverse effects on mood — causing "hostility and relationship problems."

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And other reports claim use by teens can lead to anxiety and higher stress levels during adulthood. 

But as this unrelated Harvard study pointed out in 2010, more is known about the psychiatric risks of pot use than the benefits. 

Now, as marijuana laws around the U.S. are relaxing, there's more room for in-depth research on the potential benefits. 

And that chance for increased knowledge is a move supported by the federal government. Earlier this year, the Drug Enforcement Administration approved an increase in marijuana growth for government research.  

According to The Washington Post, the new finding on violence in marriage "is a solid contribution to the marijuana literature, and we'll need a lot more like it as the country seems to move toward overall legalization." 

This was one of the first studies to measure the connection between smoking pot and domestic violence. However, the study's authors did say more research needs to be done and they would like to try to duplicate the findings. 

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