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'Black Panther' scores highest Monday ever with $40.2M

With a massive $40.2 million in ticket sales Monday, "Black Panther" has notched the biggest Monday ever at the box office and pushed its four-day total to $242 million.

The Walt Disney Co. again raised their box-office estimates for the Marvel sensation on Tuesday. The film's updated Monday performance narrowly tops the previous record, set by "Star Wars: The Force Awakens" in 2015 with $40.1 million.

The higher Monday figure gives "Black Panther" the second biggest four-day weekend, behind only the $288.1 million of "The Force Awakens."

Ryan Coogler's film is the first big-budget tentpole release featuring a nearly all-black cast. The movie's three-day gross of $201.8 ranks fifth highest all time, not accounting for inflation.

New Wynn Resorts CEO denies knowing of claims against mogul

The new CEO of Las Vegas-based Wynn Resorts said he was not aware of any of the sexual misconduct accusations against casino mogul Steve Wynn before they surfaced last month.

Matt Maddox, who was appointed CEO on Feb. 6 after Wynn resigned, said in an interview Monday that people should "hold off making any judgment until the investigations into the accusations are complete."

Wynn Resorts is facing scrutiny by gambling regulators in Nevada and Massachusetts, where the company is building a roughly $2.4 billion casino just outside Boston. Regulators in Macau, the Chinese enclave where the company operates two casinos, also are inquiring about the accusations.

Wynn has vehemently denied the misconduct accusations and attributed them to a campaign led by his ex-wife. An attorney for Elaine Wynn has denied that she instigated a report in the Wall Street Journal detailing the allegations.

The newspaper reported last month that a number of women said Steve Wynn harassed or assaulted them and that one case led to a $7.5 million settlement.

Wynn Resorts has created a committee to investigate the allegations and review the company's internal policies and procedures to ensure a "safe and respectful workplace for all employees."

Maddox, who does not sit on the board of directors, said he would leave it up to lawyers and investigators to decide whether the findings of the investigation should be made public.

Many describe Wynn as the father of modern-day Las Vegas, and by the company's own admission, his knowledge was crucial for its success. So much so, the company recently told regulators that the "business may be significantly impaired" if it lost Wynn's services.

But Maddox said Wynn Resorts is positioned to move forward without its founder and develop a number of projects in part because two longtime executives responsible for design and architecture remain with the company. He also is putting together an "innovation advisory team" to provide input.

"The idea is that our future projects are going to continue to be leading in innovation and creativity," Maddox told The Associated Press at the employee dining hall of the Wynn Las Vegas casino-resort. "We are continuing to move forward as fast as we can."

The company closed its golf course in Las Vegas last year as a step toward the development of a lake and hotel project called Paradise Park. Last month, it bought a 38-acre site along the Las Vegas Strip that Wynn, before resigning, said would be developed into a roughly 2,000-room hotel.

Maddox said the company will pursue both projects and the possibility of obtaining a license for a casino in Japan, where lawmakers approved a long-awaited law late last year on "integrated resorts," the first major hurdle in allowing casinos to open. Further legislation is expected to take several more years.

Maddox, 42, is one of Wynn Resorts' first employees. He joined the company when Wynn founded it in 2002, two years after the mogul sold the business that built the Bellagio, Mirage and Treasure Island resorts.

Initially, he spent the majority of his time raising the money to build the Wynn Las Vegas casino-resort. He later worked in Macau before returning to Sin City in 2006. He led the company through the Great Recession as the chief financial officer and became its president in 2013.

Maddox said the company's board of directors had been developing a succession plan for roughly four years, and Wynn's resignation simply accelerated its implementation.

"They, along with Steve, decided to make me the president of Wynn Resorts with the idea that eventually, assuming things continue to work well, I would become the CEO," he said.

He said the company will keep its name and logo, which is Wynn's signature.

"Wynn is about the 25,000 people who work here," he said. "The name stands for quality. It stands for service. And it's something that all of these 25,000 people look up to."

Maddox defended the company as gender inclusive, citing that 40 percent of management are women, but wants the number to increase. He has established a new leadership initiative with an immediate goal of looking at gender inequality and instituted a six-week paid parental leave policy and merit-based scholarship fund.

"I'm going around in the town halls explaining not only is the company stable, it's strong. So, all of you are safe," he said. "We are going to keep executing what we do. And I'm pointing out at each town hall that this is a zero-tolerance company."

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Follow Regina Garcia Cano on Twitter at https://twitter.com/reginagarciakNO .

Stylish Queen Elizabeth II makes first Fashion Week visit

Queen Elizabeth II has always dressed with style and flair — but Tuesday marked her first visit to the showy catwalks of London Fashion Week.

The monarch squeezed in the front row, chatting with American Vogue editor Anna Wintour — who wore her trademark sunglasses — and presented an award recognizing British design excellence.

It was an unusual outing for the 91-year-old monarch, who seemed totally at ease at the type of event usually frequented by stars like Kate Moss and Sienna Miller.

She was elegant in a Angela Kelly duck egg blue tweed dress and jacket detailed with tiny aquamarine Swarovski crystals set off by formal black gloves.

Elizabeth carried a matching handbag — of course — and wore her mostly white hair swept back.

The queen didn't bother with the statement stiletto heels favored by many of the younger fashionistas, opting for sensible dark low-heeled court shoes for the awards presentation.

"As a tribute to the industry, and as my legacy to all those who have contributed to British fashion, I would like to present this award for new, young talent," she said.

The royal family has often hosted Fashion Week receptions for top designers and journalists, but the new award — and the queen's personal visit — have added a new dimension to its support for the industry.

The lucky recipient was Richard Quinn, a recent fashion graduate of Central Saint Martins who started his own label in 2016 and has quickly earned recognition as part of the next wave of talented young British designers.

The London-based Quinn received the first Queen Elizabeth II Award for British Design. The British Fashion Council chose him for the prize.

His provocative show included a model wearing what looked to be a decorated green motorcycle helmet with a dark visor along with black and white polka dot leggings and a gauzy top with different size dots.

The queen, who has maintained an active schedule even as her 96-year-old husband Prince Philip has stepped back from public life, took to the catwalk to address the crowd and praise Britain's fashion heritage.

"From the tweed of the Hebrides to Nottingham lace, and of course Carnaby Street, our fashion industry has been renowned for outstanding craftsmanship for many years, and continues to produce world-class textiles and cutting edge, practical designs," she said.

She also toured showrooms before presenting the award on the final day of fashion week, which brought hundreds of designers, buyers and journalists to London for a series of catwalk displays highlighted by Christopher Bailey's farewell show at Burberry.

The queen's visit followed a Buckingham Palace fashion reception hosted Monday night by Catherine, the Duchess of Cambridge — who is expecting her third child in April — and Sophie, the Countess of Wessex.

The gala was attended by Wintour, model Naomi Campbell, designer Stella McCartney and other luminaries of the fashion scene.

Stars, educators lead effort for kids to see 'Black Panther'

Educators, philanthropists, celebrities, and business owners are pulling together their resources to bring children of color to see the film "Black Panther."

Elementary school students in Detroit, middle school students in Atlanta and students living Los Angeles public housing all have been surprised in recent days with free tickets and transportation to experience a movie that is captivating black communities nationwide.

The movement began in January after former ESPN "SportsCenter" host Jemele Hill called out prominent Detroiters to help young children in the city get seats to see "Black Panther."

"Black Panther" is about the mythical and highly advanced African nation of Wakanda, where T'Challa, played by Chadwick Boseman, inherits the throne but is challenged by a Wakandan exile named Killmonger, played by Michael B. Jordan.

Radiohead announces North American summer tour

Radiohead has announced a summer arena tour across North America. The English band will start the 16-date tour July 7 in Chicago and end Aug. 1 in Philadelphia.

>> Read more trending news 

Billboard reported that the tour will include a three-night run at Madison Square Garden in New York on July 10, 11 and 13.

The group’s latest album, “A Moon Shaped Pool,” was released in 2016. Tickets go on sale Feb. 23. More information, including specific dates for ticket sales at select cities, can be found at Radiohead.com.

The dates of the Radiohead 2018 North American summer tour are below.

July 7 -- Chicago at United Center

July 10 -- New York at Madison Square Garden

July 11 -- New York at Madison Square Garden

July 13 -- New York at Madison Square Garden

July 16 -- Montreal at Bell Centre

July 17 -- Montreal at Bell Centre

July 19 -- Toronto at Air Canada Centre

July 20 -- Toronto at Air Canada Centre

July 22 -- Detroit at Little Caesars Arena

July 23 -- Columbus, Ohio, at Schottenstein Center 

July 25 -- Cincinnati at US Bank Arena

July 26 -- Pittsburgh at PPG Paints Arena

July 28 -- Boston at TD Garden

July 29 -- Boston at TD Garden

July 31 -- Philadelphia at Wells Fargo Center

Aug. 1 -- Philadelphia at Wells Fargo Center

Costume designers celebrate top work at 20th awards show

The president of the Costume Designers Guild says there's so much to the art form, it can't be contained in one award.

The organization launched its annual celebration of the best work in film and television two decades ago to highlight costumes' contribution to storytelling, said guild president Salvador Perez.

"When you see characters onscreen and they have such iconic looks, none of that was written," he says. "That was all come up with by costume designers."

While the Oscars and Emmys also recognize costume design (Perez was nominated in 2015 for his work on "The Mindy Project"), the guild's awards are broken into categories that highlight the intricacies of contemporary, period and sci-fi or fantasy designs.

Only three of the five contenders for the Oscar in costume design are also nominated at the 20th Costume Designers Guild Awards. Actress Gina Rodriguez is set to host the ceremony Tuesday night at the Beverly Hilton Hotel in Beverly Hills, California.

Besides the competitive awards, special honors will be presented to Kerry Washington and Guillermo del Toro. Longtime Steven Spielberg collaborator Joanna Johnston will receive the Career Achievement Award.

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Entertainment Writer Sandy Cohen is at www.twitter.comn/YouKnowSandy .

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For full coverage of awards season, visit: https://apnews.com/tag/AwardsSeason .

Rhode Island marks 15 years since 100 killed in club fire

Rhode Island is marking the 15th anniversary of a nightclub fire that killed 100 people and injured more than 200 others.

The Feb. 20, 2003, fire at The Station nightclub in West Warwick started when pyrotechnics for the rock band Great White set fire to flammable foam installed as soundproofing.

The brothers who owned the club and Great White's tour manager were charged in the fire. All three reached plea deals, with the tour manager pleading guilty to 100 counts of manslaughter and the brothers pleading no contest. Lawsuits brought by survivors and victims' relatives were settled for $176 million.

The site of the fire is now a memorial park.

On Tuesday, some survivors and victims' relatives will gather there to discuss a new federal tax incentive for sprinkler installation.

Yiannopoulos dropping lawsuit against former publisher

Milo Yiannopoulos is dropping his lawsuit against his former publisher.

In papers filed Tuesday in New York State Supreme Court, Yiannopoulos and Simon & Schuster asked that the case be dismissed "without costs or fees to either party." The far-right author and agitator sued for $10 million last summer after the publisher canceled the release of his memoir "Dangerous." Simon & Schuster acted after video clips of Yiannopoulos surfaced in which he appeared to defend sexual relationships between men and underage boys. Yiannopoulos alleged breach of contract and said the publisher gave in to "false and misleading reports." Simon & Schuster had called the suit a publicity stunt.

Last fall, a judge allowed the case to proceed after Simon & Schuster had asked that it be dismissed. But in January, Yiannopoulous' legal counsel withdrew and the author announced that he would represent himself.

"We are pleased that Mr. Yiannopoulos' lawsuit has been withdrawn," Simon & Schuster said in a statement Tuesday. "We stand by our decision to terminate the publication of Mr. Yiannopoulos' book."

In a Facebook posting Tuesday, Yiannopoulos said ending the suit was a "tough decision" but the "right one." He wrote that "it was always going to be hard to prove damages, as anyone who has ever hired a 'damages expert' will know."

Yiannopoulos eventually self-published "Dangerous," which came out last July 4.

"I don't want to spend all the money I made from my book, and the next two years of my life, on a lawsuit," he wrote on Facebook.

Guess co-founder steps aside amid misconduct investigation

Guess Inc. says that co-founder Paul Marciano will give up his day-to-day responsibilities at the clothing company until a sexual misconduct investigation is completed.

Model and actress Kate Upton told Time magazine earlier this month that Marciano forcibly grabbed her breasts during a Guess photo shoot nearly eight years ago. She also says that he harassed her by showing up at hotels she was staying at and texting her inappropriate comments.

Marciano has denied the allegations.

Guess, based in Los Angeles, says that Marciano will not be paid while he steps aside. He is an executive chairman of the company's board, and is its chief creative officer.

Marciano, who co-founded the brand with his brother in 1981, also owns a 17 percent stake in Guess.

Picasso, Monet works up for auction in Rockefeller art trove

An art collection amassed by billionaire David Rockefeller could raise more than $500 million for charity when it is auctioned this spring.

Auctioneer Christie's is selling hundreds of artworks including major paintings by Claude Monet, Henri Matisse and Pablo Picasso, from the collection of the oil-family scion and his wife Peggy .

Rockefeller, grandson of Standard Oil founder John D. Rockefeller, died in March at the age of 101. His family is selling the art collection to benefit cultural, educational, medical and environmental charities.

It includes Monet's water-lily painting "Nympheas en fleur," estimated to sell for $50 million to $70 million, and Picasso's "Fillette a la corbeille fleurie (Young Girl with a Flower Basket)," which has an estimate of $90 million to $120 million.

"You end up running out of superlatives," Jonathan Rendell, deputy chairman of Christie's Americas, said at a preview Tuesday. "Some of the things are jaw-dropping."

Rendell cites Picasso's "extraordinary" portrait of a young girl, which was painted in 1905 when the artist was in his early 20s, and first bought by writer Gertrude Stein.

Also up for sale is a small painting of an apple, given by Picasso as a gift to Stein, a friend and patron.

"That little apple is a lovely object because it takes you right into the history of art," Rendell said. "Picasso's gift to Gertrude Stein, who made his career — it doesn't get much better than that."

Matisse's reclining nude, "Odalisque couchee aux magnolias" is expected to sell for $50 million, breaking the sale record for the artist.

"I expect to see quite a lot of records broken," Rendell said. He added: "That was my most English understatement."

As well as major European Impressionist and modern paintings, the Rockefeller collection includes works by American artists such as Edward Hopper and Georgia O'Keefe. Also up for sale is a selection of furniture, jewelry, Chinese bronzes and porcelain — including a dessert service that accompanied Napoleon into exile on the island of Elba.

Highlights of the collection are on display in London from Wednesday to March 8. There will also be previews in Paris, Beijing, Los Angeles and Shanghai before a series of sales in New York from May 7 to 11.

Eugenides, Chernow voted into arts academy

Historian Ron Chernow, playwright Lynn Nottage and artist Jenny Holzer are among this year's inductees in the American Academy of Arts and Letters.

On Tuesday, the academy told The Associated Press that others voted into the organization include fiction writers George Saunders and Jeffrey Eugenides, playwright Terrence Rafferty, and musicians Ben Johnston and George Lewis.

The academy is an honor society founded in 1898. It has a core membership of 250 living writers, musicians and visual artists. Members in the past have included Mark Twain, James Baldwin and Leonard Bernstein.

Fergie, Katherine Heigl, KFC

Fergie apologized for her National Anthem train-wreck at the NBA All-Star Game, saying:

"I've always been honored and proud to perform the national anthem, and last night I wanted to try something special for the NBA.  I'm a risk taker artistically, but clearly this rendition didn't strike the intended tone. I love this country and honestly tried my best". MORE HERE

Fergie's ex, actor Josh Duhamel, still supports her, despite the split. After her National Anthem fiasco, he showed up at her house with flowers and a note that said "I love you." He was dropping off their 4 year old son, who also had a card that read "I love you always and forever mommy." E! Online

Katherine Heigl shared her 14 month weight loss journey, after welcoming her baby, Joshua Jr

KFC chicken shortage means they had to shut down about 900 stores in Britain yesterday! The shortage was due to a delivery issue. MSN

R. Kelly has been evicted from 2 houses that he was renting in Atlanta. Apparently, he owes the property management over $30,000! MORE HERE

Sylvester Stallone assures fans he is 'alive and well' after death hoax goes viral

Actor Sylvester Stallone is the victim of a death hoax.

A rumor claiming that the 71-year-old actor had passed away recently surfaced on social media — and he was not happy about it.

>> Read more trending news 

Stallone took to Twitter to express his annoyance.

“Please ignore the stupidity,” the “Rocky” star tweeted Monday. “Alive and well and happy and healthy … Still punching!”

>> See the tweet here

Stallone’s younger brother, Frank, also took to the social media platform to inform everyone of the death hoax. And he wasn’t happy either.

“Rumors that my brother is dead are false,” he wrote. “What kind of sick demented cruel mind thinks of things like this to post? People like this are mentally deranged and don’t deserve a place in society.”

>> See the tweet here

Read more here.

Court told actress swore at Geoffrey Rush to leave toilet

An actress who accused Oscar-winning actor Geoffrey Rush of inappropriately touching her on a Sydney stage later swore at him when he followed her into a toilet at a party after a performance, Australian court documents allege.

Rush is suing Sydney's The Daily Telegraph newspaper in Federal Court for defamation over articles last year that he argued portray him as a pervert and sexual predator. The articles allege inappropriate behavior and touching during the Sydney Theatre Company production of "King Lear" in 2015.

Accusations in defense documents previously suppressed by the court were made public on Tuesday.

Eryn Jean Norvill played Cordelia alongside the 66-year-old Australian actor, who played the title role and her father.

The documents allege Rush touched Norvill in a way that made her feel uncomfortable on five separate occasions during the final week of the production, in a scene where he carried her as she simulated a lifeless body.

Rush's lawyer, Richard McHugh, told the court on Monday the accusations were vague.

But the newspaper will attempt to prove that Rush engaged in scandalously inappropriate behavior, and that his conduct was so serious that the theatre company would not work with him again.

The defense documents allege Norvill was visibly upset and told Rush to stop after the first instance of on-stage touching, which was not scripted, directed or necessary for the performance.

Rush is also accused of following the actress into the women's toilet at a restaurant during the cast's celebration after the final performance. Rush is accused of standing outside her toilet stall until she swore at him and told him to leave.

The newspaper denies Rush's claims that its articles made him out to be a pervert and a sexual predator, and its lawyers previously told the court they made no allegations of a sexual nature.

Justice Michael Wigney on Monday delayed to a later date Rush's request to have the newspaper's truth defense struck out.

Rush has performed in the Sydney Theatre Company for 35 years. He won the 1997 best actor Academy Award for "Shine" and has three other Oscar nominations. He is perhaps best known as Captain Barbossa in the "Pirates of the Caribbean" films.

Actor Michael Keaton to give Kent State commencement address

Actor Michael Keaton is slated to give the commencement address at Ohio's Kent State University.

Keaton enrolled at Kent State in 1971, intending to major in journalism and speech. He left school to pursue acting, landing appearances on "Mister Rogers' Neighborhood," ''Maude" and "The Mary Tyler Moore Show." His range of hit movies includes "Batman," ''Birdman" and "Spotlight."

Keaton spoke at Kent State in 1985 and said then that he would like to return someday.

Kent State President Beverly Warren says having Keaton speak at the May 12th ceremony is a "rare opportunity" for graduates to hear from "someone who has walked in their shoes and now has risen to the top of his field."

The school will pay Keaton $100,000, the same it paid actress Octavia Spencer last year.

'SNL' alum Quinn recovering from heart attack with humor

"Saturday Night Live" alum Colin Quinn is exercising his wit days after a heart attack interrupted his busy touring schedule.

The 58-year-old Quinn took to Twitter on Monday to let friends and foes alike know he's "starting a list of those who didn't 'check in' yet," five days after his Valentine's Day health emergency.

The deep-thinking comic thanks the doctors and nurses at his New York hospital, saying they "realized they had a precious jewel of comedy in their hands."

Quinn announced his heart attack last week, saying on Twitter his heart broke on Valentine's Day, "literally." He said he was doing well but if he dropped dead "you would see a funeral like Al Capone!"

He says the attack made him reflect, realizing "we aren't guaranteed tomorrow."

French ice dancer doesn't risk another wardrobe malfunction

Highlights from media coverage of the Pyeongchang Olympics:

WARDROBE MALFUNCTION: Gabriella Papadakis took no chances. Her ice dancing costume on Tuesday contained no hooks, nothing that could come undone as it did a day earlier in the Olympics' most famous wardrobe malfunction. The French athlete and partner Guillaume Cizeron completed a lovely, lyrical free skate to win a silver medal behind the Canadian team of Tessa Virtue and Scott Moir, but it was hard not to see in their faces the belief that the faulty costume had cost them gold. NBC analyst Tanith White said she was "sitting here grabbing my chest feeling my heart pound" after their performance. White, however, punted when the time came to give her opinion on the deserving winner. "It's making me sweat, just the idea of having to choose between the Canadian and the French, but most important, they were both exceptional," she said. True, it was tough. But that's her job.

WARDROBE MALFUNCTION, PART TWO: After two wardrobe malfunctions on the ice, it was hard to watch Canadian Kaitlyn Weaver's ice dancing routine without focusing on a loose red strap that kept falling down her arm. Apparently it was part of the costume.

TUMBLE: NBC analyst Luke Van Valin built up the tension as defending American gold medalist Maddie Bowman skied through her final run in the freestyle halfpipe, noting as she was in the air that Bowman had reached the point where she wiped out in her first two runs. Then it happened again. Van Valin and Todd Harris wisely stayed quiet as the camera bore witness to Bowman sobbing in the snow, recognizing the moment as a metaphor for the U.S. team's rough showing in Pyeongchang. It was a welcome example of Van Valin stepping out of a world in which he's too comfortable. He tends to get lost in numbers describing various moves, and "amplitude" is clearly his favorite word. We were stunned, however, to hear him talking about an earlier conversation with a judge about what they needed to see in a routine by American Brita Sigourney. Extraordinary reporting. But are Olympic judges supposed to be that forthcoming about a competition that hasn't been completed yet?

I'M SO EXCITED: A tie for bobsled gold! OMG OMG OMG! We thought NBC's Leigh Diffey would blow a gasket when a Canadian team hit the same 3 minutes, 16.86 second winning time as a pair of Germans. Darned if he can't pull history out of thin air. "It's a tie!" Diffey said. "The last time Canada won a gold medal it was a tie as well. History repeats!" Not off your couch and cheering yet? "The Olympic sliding center has seen some amazing things these games but nothing like this!"

TWEET OF THE NIGHT : "So great that @leighdiffey and @JohnMorgan7 can make almost every bobsled run sound like a walk-off home run in Game 7 of the World Series." — @zagfreak.

RUSSIAN TROUBLE: NBC doesn't have a great track record of talking about uncomfortable Olympic stories that are making news elsewhere, like the sexual misconduct accusations against Shaun White or Shani Davis' unhappiness at not being a flagbearer. So it should be noted that the network addressed, in prime time and elsewhere, the doping charge against a Russian curler.

RATINGS: It was a comparatively slow Sunday for Olympic content, with an average of 18.2 million watching on NBC, NBCSN or through streaming services in prime time. That's down 15 percent from Sochi four years ago; the NBC-only telecast was down 23 percent. Saturday was the least-watched night of the Olympics so far, with 16.1 million viewers on NBC, NBCSN and streaming services, although that was down only 6 percent from Sochi. Viewership has largely exceeded expectations for the first half of the Olympics, but interest tends to dwindle in the second week.

LAST LAUGH: NBC baffled some viewers Sunday by showing extended coverage of meaningless training runs by downhill skiers. The Nielsen company gave a window into NBC's thinking: The night's viewership peaked at 20.7 million when America's skiing sweethearts, Lindsey Vonn and Mikaela Shiffrin, were on the mountain. So no one should have been surprised to see yet another Vonn practice run on Monday's telecast.

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Corrects to Todd Harris from Trace Worthing.

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More AP Olympic coverage: https://wintergames.ap.org

Key mix-up at Met leaves tenor, conductor scrambling

Michael Fabiano was singing at the Metropolitan Opera when a key mix-up occurred.

The tenor began Rodolfo's famous first act aria in Puccini's "La Boheme" on Friday night when it became clear the orchestra was playing in a different key under conductor Marco Armiliato.

"I said, oh, no, they can't be doing this," Fabiano recalled on Monday.

The Met is presenting Franco Zeffirelli's 1981 production 15 times this season with four different lead tenors. When Russell Thomas sang the role in October and November, he opted for a version of "Che gelida manina! (How cold your little hand is!)" that was one half tone down and finished with a top B natural, as opposed to the original key which ends in a top C, the Met music staff said.

Puccini wrote both versions, and Fabiano prefers the higher key.

"The brilliance of the whole aria is lost in the transposition," Fabiano said. "When you sing in the lower key, the whole aria becomes fatter."

But the orchestra's sheet music never got changed for the resumption of the run last week. Fabiano glanced at the podium when that became apparent.

"We took a look at each other, like, what can we do now?" Armiliato said.

The tenor kept on going, but the mix-up was noticeable enough to prompt comments on the Opera-L chat room.

"Once you're on the new train track, there's no way to stop, have a timeout on the football field and confer," Fabiano said.

The Met said the parts will be restored to the original key for the remaining performances.

Fabiano took solace at one aspect of the mix-up.

"It's better to be down than up, I'll tell you that," he said.

Fergie says National Anthem at NBA All-Star Game 'didn't strike the intended tone'

Fergie is responding to critics of her sultry, jazzy rendition of the national anthem at the NBA All-Star Game. The singer issued a statement to TMZ, saying her version at Sunday night’s game in Los Angeles “didn't strike the intended tone.”

>> Read more trending news 

“I’ve always been honored and proud to perform the national anthem and last night I wanted to try something special for the NBA,” the statement said. “I’m a risk taker artistically, but clearly this rendition didn't strike the intended tone. I love this country and honestly tried my best.”

WATCH: Fergie’s national anthem performance at the NBA All-Star Game baffles viewers

Wearing an off-the-shoulder dress, Fergie sang the national anthem with a number of ad-libs and some lengthy notes. At one point, Golden State Warriors player  Draymond Green could be seen stifling a laugh, and so could late-night talk show host Jimmy Kimmel.

One person who had some words of support for Fergie was Mariah Carey, who told TMZ cameras the singer needn’t listen to negativity.

“Darling, nobody needs to listen to that,” she said.

Fergie’s national anthem performance can be watched below.

Jesse Jackson: LeBron's 'slam dunk for justice is needed'

The Rev. Jesse Jackson said on Monday he's deeply insulted by a Fox News host's "attack" on Cleveland Cavaliers star LeBron James and thanked the basketball All-Star for standing up for what he believes in.

Political commentator Laura Ingraham criticized the three-time NBA champion for his recent comments about social issues, suggesting he should "shut up and dribble." James has vowed he won't do that, saying he'll continue to "talk about what's really important."

Jackson said it's important for James, Golden State Warriors teammates Kevin Durant and Stephen Curry and other NBA players to keep speaking out against injustice and the behavior of President Donald Trump.

"No one told David to just play his harp and not stand up for his people," Jackson said by telephone from Chicago on Monday. "No one told Samson just lift weights and not challenge the Philistines. They told Jackie Robinson, 'Just play baseball.' He told them, 'I'm a man with dignity first.' They told Dr. King, 'Go be confined to the pulpit.' He said, 'I must speak peace to a troubled world.' In that tradition, King James, LeBron, his slam dunk for justice is needed. We thank him."

Jackson, who founded the two nonprofit organizations that merged to become Rainbow/PUSH, said it's star athletes' duty to speak up when confronted with inequity or wrongdoing.

"When Trump is attacking the FBI and covering up for the KGB," Jackson said, "LeBron's voice is needed."

The Republican president has repeatedly slammed the FBI, tweeting that its reputation was in "tatters" and suggesting it failed to stop a Florida school shooting massacre because it was fixated on investigating allegations Russia meddled in the 2016 election.

Jackson disclosed last year he has Parkinson's disease. He said on Monday he's doing "very well."

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